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In chapter 1* of On Writing, King says that Carrie White was based on two girls that he knew from high school. All the details mentioned in the question are there, but not in those exact words. It is likely that Wikipedia's source for their quote is Secret Windows. muru has left a comment with a link to a website with the exact quote, attributed to an ...


8

The Internet Archive has three editions of It, spanning more than 30 years: November 1986, New York: Viking September 1987, New York: Signet July 2017, New York: Scribner All three have the same text, namely: Derry. My home town. Named after the county of the same name in Ireland. Accordingly, I suggest that you correctly remembered that the name was ...


7

All of them. By the end of The Dark Tower, it is revealed that the story takes place If you're looking for a list of every explicit reference, Wikipedia had a good list going that you can edit, but this has been deleted. I'm leaving that link in just in case someone recreates that page, but otherwise you can read the list on archive.org.


7

Yes. I don't know what degree of 'notability' you're looking for in criticism of how harshly King portrayed Smith in his book, but certainly there has been public criticism. In a Cracked article entitled 6 Famous Works of Art You Didn't Know Were Vicious Insults, Stephen King is described as passive-aggressive and living in permanent rage at Smith. To be ...


4

In spoken languages there's an idea of "stressed" and "unstressed" syllables. A stressed syllable is pronounced with more force and emphasis. In English there are words like "permit" that mean different things when the stressed syllable changes. "PERmit", with the first syllable stressed, is a noun that means "...


3

In 1856, John Ruskin coined the term pathetic fallacy (in Modern Painters, Volume III, Part IV) to denote the attribution of human feelings to inanimate objects. One of the examples he gave comes from the poem The Sands o' Dee by Charles Kingsley: They rowed her in across the rolling foam,— The cruel, crawling foam, The cruel, hungry foam,— Ruskin ...


3

What ‘Shawshank’ suggests to me, is a surname from the Scottish Borders. The name is made up of two elements that are common in English and Scots surnames and placenames: ‘shaw’ meaning ‘covert’ or ‘shelter’; and ‘shank’ meaning literally ‘leg’ but figuratively ‘a projecting point of a hill’. ‘Shaw’ is found in surnames deriving from placenames: A ‘shaw’ ...


3

I think you may be thinking too much about the specifics of what Stan was saying. What drives off It is not the birds, but rather Stan drawing strength from his passion. Birdwatching is a major part of his life, something he's passionate about, and he's drawing strength from it to oppose It. My impression is that It is empowered by the fear and despair of ...


3

TL;DR: It means that it was very hot. The addition of ‘hinges’ to the common English idiom ‘hot as hell’ provides emphasis via alliteration. (Alliteration for emphasis is the reason we go to hell in a handbasket rather than some more practical mode of conveyance.) Hell is traditionally depicted with doors or gates, which would naturally have hinges. In the ...


3

The actual situation that Jake ends up in after Roland left him behind is...a little odd, primarily because of other events later in book 2, The Drawing of the Three. It's not exactly like "nothing happened to him". But without spoiling too much, rest assured that Jake will make a comeback to the Dark Tower series, specifically in book 3 The Waste Lands, and ...


3

Is it possible Stan is obsessive-compulsive? In the book, King makes it clear how neat Stan is, even referring to him as the smallest adult in Derry. In the bathroom-cleaning scene in the book, the care with which Stan cleans the blood off the wallpaper is deliberately pointed out. When he's thinking to himself about IT in the laundromat, he seems more ...


2

(Spoilers,duh) I think that Stan reacts so "strongly" to it returning because he says before 1984 (when the losers were kids) that he says he saw IT in her "TRUE FORM". I think even when years have passed, he is still VERY scared, and thinks he knows what they are up against, and thinks they can't defeat IT. He is also the most skeptical of the losers, and ...


2

Phrases of the form "something and something and something, oh my!" are fairly widespread as a sort of meme (or snowclone) originating from the classic 1939 film The Wizard of Oz: Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my! (Youtube link) It's discussed, with many variants listed, at the Snowclones Database, and lambasted at the Madam Grammar blog. In the context ...


2

“Lovecraft out of Arkham” refers to the horror writing of H. P. Lovecraft whose writing includes the fictional setting of Arkham, Massachusetts. “Kerouac out of Southern Cal” conversely refers to the beat writing of Jack Kerouac (best known for On the Road). The meaning here is that her face is horrifying rather than beautiful.


1

In today's era, saying someone's work is based on someone else's work is equivalent to calling the former as ungrateful and the latter as unacknowledged. We tend to relate things and find patterns in similar things, but we fail to grasp the real exquisite feeling that produced the work. It happened with every subject at some point in history where people ...


1

The phrase in the novel is limited to 'Hitler's rise', it does not specify his rise 'to power', so there is no reason to tie the timescale strictly to his elevation to or consolidation of power. The OED gives the relevant definition of 'rise' as Movement towards a position of greater power, influence, or prosperity. So it could be argued, given the ten ...


1

This is a personal opinion rather than something I can reference, but to me the key to understanding this passage is this line: You’re the caretaker, sir, you’ve always been the caretaker. I should know, sir. I’ve always been here. The same manager hired us both, at the same time When you unpick this, it's far more startling than Grady's claim not to ...


1

Your answer lies in the specific characteristics of each bird mentioned. I have not read the book but per your question will give you an answer. Will use the example of eagles. This bird roars above all existence, only topped by the sky and the unknown. Science says they know what's above the sky I see but I've never been there. Why believe what I haven't ...


1

The entry for Stan on Wikipedia is as follows; Stan is the most skeptical member of the Club. He is Jewish and is persecuted by Henry Bowers for this reason. Logic, order, and cleanliness are deeply ingrained in his psyche. He relies on logic more than anything else and is the least willing to accept that It actually exists. As an adult, he becomes a ...


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