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1

Neruda’s first two lines seems to set the tone for most of the rest of the poem No te amo como si fueras rosa de sal, topacio o flecha de claveles que propagan el fuego: The “rosa de sal” connotes a beautiful/useful thing that forms on surfaces, while the rest are all showy, outer, things (for “rosa de sal” see wikipedia under “fleur de sel”). These lines ...


0

As in English, the first month of the Spanish year is named after Janus, the Greek double-faced god, who looks behind at the past year and forward toward the new. Janus was also the god of thresholds, liminal spaces and doors, likely accounting for all the back and forth in the narrator’s words and the reference to the “key.” Some more information from ...


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I tend to think that Neruda is talking about the possibility or potential of the man in the poem engendering a child with the unnamed woman and that, were this to occur, this potential child (or the life flowing through the child’s veins) would then, through her/his existence, “ground”him (a “sailor” who, instead, would like to have a woman waiting at every ...


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An English translation of "Encargo" appeared in New Orleans Review, vol. 6 no. 2, p. 105, with the title "Commission." The translators are Calvin Harlan, Manuel Menan, and Beatriz Varela. The journal is published by the Department of English at Loyola University. Although the issue does not give a specific date, the journal has been ...


2

I agree that this wasn’t very clear but this is what I think happened. Spoiler Alert I think that Penelope either assumed this via Jorge (her brother) or Miquel may have actually told her to keep her from reaching out to Julian for the same reason Miquel went to the train station and didn’t tell Julian what happened with Penelope (that she was boarded up in ...


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