11

The phrase “starry pole” is a quotation from Milton’s Paradise Lost, whose book IV describes the life of Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden: Thus, at their shady lodge arrived, both stood, Both turned, and under open sky adored The God that made both sky, air, earth, and heaven, Which they beheld, the moon’s resplendent globe, And starry pole. John Milton (...


3

Compare the illuminated versions of The Songs of Innocence and of Experience, wherein we find The Tyger to the roughly contemporary Tommy Thumb's Song Book and there are many similarities. The Tommy Thumb book was apparently first published in 1745 but I have included an 1815 edition. The page layouts are similar: one poem per page. Both books have many ...


3

The assumption in other answers is that "ban" refers to censorship or prohibitions, but it probably refers to marriage bans. This explains the last line's reference to the marriage hearse, which is, as suggested by @Peter Shor, very connected: Blake was an early supporter of open marriage/polyamory. He considered monogamous marriage as legalized ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible