10

This answer is somewhat of a generalization of my self answer to Why did the stars throw down their spears? where I ended up analyzing most of the poem to explain the meaning of one particular, mystifying line. It's all based on my own reading and my meager knowledge of Blake's philosophy. The most obvious deeper meaning in "The Tyger" is how, in ...


7

The perceived "banality" in relation to Innocence & Experience may be regarded as a device. In fact, the poems are all quite profound, but structured in a way as to be suitable for children as well as adults. A clue to the meaning can be found in Blake's ideas on the nature of the universe, which involves creative and destructive forces. "One Law ...


6

There is no one answer: a key part of this poem's appeal is its ambiguity. On the surface, it seems a poetic description of a rose flower sickening and dying due to a parasitic infection. However, the opening lines make it clear it should not be read literally: no "worm" is "invisible", nor does it "fly". So how can we interpret the metaphor? First, what ...


6

There's a substantial body of evidence that the title "Songs of Innocence" points to the fact that the poems were intended to be sung. In the article William Blake and the Music of the Songs, Kevin Hutchins outlines several pieces of evidence for this: The romantic period sought to draw on the historic connection between music and poetry. As Hutchins ...


5

Let's start by listing the titles of all the Songs, and noting that you can read them in full here. I'll now discuss various possible pairings among these poems, but bear in mind that there's no definitive answer to this. Arguments could be made for many different ways of pairing up, and we're never going to have a perfect bijection. It's almost an exercise ...


4

the title “Holy Thursday” implies a religious context, making ["Blake appeals to his readers' faith"] also correct. That sentence from the textbook betrays a remarkable lack of understanding of poetry and of Blake's poetry in particular. Just because the title refers to a religious date, doesn't at all mean the author is appealing to his readers' faith. I ...


3

My sense is that Blake is talking about ownership, and the idea that the natural rights of people to the land and its resources is restricted by the artificial laws of man. Charter (noun) formal written instrument bestowing privileges and rights, serving as legal evidence of them," c. 1200, from Old French chartre (12c.) "charter, letter, document, ...


3

This sense of mark (to take note of) is found here¹: Notice or pay careful attention to. ‘he'll leave you, you mark my words!’ It doesn’t look like it’s intended to refer to a name, just a simple word play (you could just about get away with using spot instead, since that also has meanings which include notice and stain). ¹ Oxford Living Dictionaries


3

Blake's poems are cryptic and invite multiple interpretations. To my amazement, while researching this question I found that the 26 stanzas of these two poems inspired, among other things, an academic paper that runs to 154 pages! So, as you might expect, there are a lot of theories. Most of them relate in some way to Greek mythology, which is a continuing ...


3

The original punctuation of the poem seems to be: I wander thro' each charter'd street, Near where the charter'd Thames does flow, And mark in every face I meet Marks of weakness, marks of woe, In every cry of every Man, In every Infants cry of fear, In every voice: in every ban, The mind-forg'd manacles I hear How the Chimney-...


2

According to W. H. Stevenson's edition of Blake's complete poems (in the series Longman Annotated English Poets), the original phrase was "german-forged manacles", "suggesting the strength of skilled workmanship" (Stevenson, p. 220). By contrast, "mind-forged", according to Stevenson, [emphasizes] that the fetters are not inevitable, but created in the ...


2

I have never met Sherri Poterfield so obviously I can only speculate on why she made this choice. But that I will do! The Poterfield's melody begins with a musical structure that is called a "Satz" (or sentence). A Satz consists of two halves: the presentation and the continuation. The presentation has two halves: first comes an "idea", or a motif (musical ...


2

The resemblance is mostly thematic. According to Bono (lead vocalist and primary lyricist of U2), the main thing they took from Blake was the idea of comparing innocence and experience: I try not to talk about William Blake too much because it sounds pretentious quoting such a literary giant but it was his great idea I pinched to compare the person we ...


1

In W. H. Stevenson's edition of Blake's poems, the editor explains that the charters (see the definition in DukeZhou's answer) used to represent a source of freedom. One of the charters that are relevant to London is the charter that William the Conqueror granted to the city in 1067, "which upheld previous Saxon rights, privileges and laws" (Wikipedia: ...


1

This almost certainly has to do with the technology of printing, and the economics of publishing. There are currently many modern editions of Blake's illuminated works, and they contain much detail and many colors. To the best of my knowledge, the printing technology for mass reproduction of complex color images wasn't readily available: Alois ...


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