40

He simply got tired of writing about Holmes, and he wanted to focus on his other writing. I'm going to quote from a book called The Best of Sherlock Holmes, by Wordsworth Classics: However, even before the ink was dry on the manuscript of 'The Copper Beeches' its author had wearied of Sherlock Holmes. In fact, by the end of 1891 he had written to his mother,...


36

Lamb To The Slaughter. This was a short story by Roald Dahl that was initially rejected. She owes it to the child to escape discovery if she can. She prepares the leg of lamb that she used as a weapon and places it in the oven to somewhat destroy the evidence. Then she considers an alibi. After practising a cheerful mask and some innocuous remarks to make ...


26

It took me a second to get it; you have to say it out loud. When you do, you might hear a bit of a familiar melody come to mind. He's playing off the lyrics to George M. Cohan's "Give My Regards to Broadway": Give my regards to Broadway Remember me to Herald Square Tell all the gang at Forty-Second Street That I will soon be there A full story ...


25

Is it possible that the planet was actually Jupiter? In that case, the story may be Isaac Asimov's Victory Unintentional. To what extent do the characteristics of both descriptions (question and Wikipedia article) match? "three robots": ZZ One, ZZ Two, and ZZ Three, "spaceship designed for them": "spacecraft ... does not need to ...


21

This strongly reminds me of The Long Earth series by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter. I distinctly remember a passage about the main character, Joshua Valiente, which matches the quoted passage comparing him with Daniel Boone. In this series, there's a device called a Stepper which lets humans step between parallel Earths. Checking Wikipedia, it seems ...


18

Typing a few keywords (robot collect animals weight range chase human short story) into google came up with the following story: The Ruum by Arthur Porges published 1953 Synopsis: A shape-shifting, indestructible robot—a "Type H-9 Ruum"—is accidentally left behind on earth during the age of the dinosaurs by visiting aliens, and not recovered ...


17

The quote is a parody of the folklore motif known as the king in disguise. In Norse mythology Odin was said to wander in disguise among humans. Shakespeare used the king-in-disguise motif in Act 4, scene 1 of Henry V. Outside of fiction, a number of real kings and queens have been said to disguise themselves, e.g. King Charles XI of Sweden (1655 – 1697), who ...


16

"An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", a short story by Ambrose Bierce. The full text is available at Project Gutenberg. Wikipedia plot summary: Peyton Farquhar, a civilian and plantation owner, is being prepared for execution by hanging from an Alabama railroad bridge during the American Civil War. Six military men and a company of infantrymen are present,...


15

"Living in W'ales" by Richard Hughes, 1931 After some searching around Google Books and the internet in general, I believe it's the above short children's story, first published in The Spider's Palace and Other Stories. The best synopsis I can find is from this blog post (emphasis mine): In the first story, “Living in W’ales,” “Once there was a man who ...


14

The story is called The Discounters of Money. It occurs in the collection of O. Henry stories called Roads of Destiny. It occupies pages 379 to 384 in this book. …and there you have young Howard Pilkins with 4,000,000; and a good fellow at that. He was an agreeable, modestly arrogant young man, who implicitly believed that money could buy anything that ...


14

"The Monster", a 1970 short story by R. Chetwynd-Hayes, was reprinted in Fantasy Tales, Spring 1991 which is available at the Internet Archive. The story seems also to be the answer to this old question on the Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange. A young woman is in hiding in a house, kept there because she is hideous / bestial and human society ...


14

Mother Goose, in fact. Little Miss Muffet Sat on a tuffet, Eating her curds and whey; Along came a spider, Who sat down beside her, And frightened Miss Muffet away. It has the spider, the fright, and being Mother Goose, the pop-cultural awareness for the reader to recognize.


13

This is called a feghoot: a story that builds up to a pun for its punchline. Asimov seems to have had a fondness for feghoots, as he did this in several stories: "Loint of Paw", about a criminal who uses the statute of limitations and a time machine to his advantage, has the punchline "a niche in time, saves Stein". "Battle Hymn" has "Mars says yes!" (for ...


13

The Three Sillies is your story. There are many kids book editions so matching the particular one you saw might be hard. Quoting from the link, So that was another big silly. Then the gentleman went on his travels again; and he came to a village, and outside the village there was a pond, and round the pond was a crowd of people. And they had got rakes, and ...


13

Masti here is describing the characteristics of a new born baby. Going through the 3 things which he uses to describe: milk stains on one side of her face and This refers to the milk stains on the cheek caused due to either spilt milk on their cheeks while feeding or because the baby has pushed back the milk from their mouth causing it to spill over on ...


12

Brenci Patiño makes the point that the two women, Modesta and the indigenous woman, are "pitted against each other" by the social structure around them. They "share similar experiences of oppression," but must fight each other for survival. Modesta, as a servant to a wealthy family, was abused and made to live in fear. So the specific ...


12

Is this "A Case of Mis-Identity"? I haven't been able to find the story on its own, but I know it is in the author's compilation, Morse's Greatest Mystery and Other Stories, by Colin Dexter. I'm guessing you remember him as a writer of detective fiction because his main creation, Inspector Morse, is the protagonist of most of the other stories. ...


12

After intensive search I found it. Writer: Sever Gansovsky. Story: Demon of history (1967). And I found Russian text: Демон истории.


12

The essay you're thinking of is possibly "William Dean Howells" by Mark Twain. Towards the end of the piece, he criticizes those who ape the greatness of Mr. Howells by attempting to imitate his "stage directions," and succeed only in making their work boring by the meaningless repetition of the same few tired phrases. Here is the ...


12

The meaning of "up yourself" being "conceited" ("being up your own ass" or "up yourself") from @skooba and @Michael Finn is correct, but neither answer fully captures the particular context you have mentioned (Sorry Skooba, but I disagree with your interpretation): Why is it that: "They wouldn’t know if they were [conceited] if they didn’t have a ...


11

The stories of I, Robot - and Asimov's robot stories in general - tend to circle around two central themes: Humanity's control and understanding of the technology it has created. Non-human life, and the capacity of life which simulates humanity to feel and be human. These two themes are in tension with each other, which is part of what makes them such a ...


11

You are bringing the first quote a little out of context: The idealists argue that the hexagonal rooms are a necessary from of absolute space or, at least, of our intuition of space. They reason that a triangular or pentagonal room is inconceivable. (The mystics claim that their ecstasy reveals to them a circular chamber containing a great circular book, ...


11

This famous story is called The Lady Or The Tiger (1882), by Frank R. Stockton. The cliffhanger ending is complicated by the fact that the princess knows which door is which, and directs her lover to open the (actually right, not left) door. The man opens it without hesitation. The story is famous because it asks the reader to decide the ending for ...


11

TL;DR: ‘Helium’ is a misprint for ‘hellum’ which is a dialect spelling of ‘helm’. Let’s get the easier parts out of the way before we tackle ‘helium’. The Toad is a “sloop, of 8,825–10,000 registered tonnage”. I don’t really understand this description—a ‘sloop’ is normally a sailing vessel with a single fore-and-aft rigged mast, but a vessel of 10,000 ...


10

A central concern of The Library of Babel -- and particularly this section of it -- is the search for order and meaning within a chaotic world. In this passage, Borges introduces the Purifiers; those who, in their pursuit of truth and meaning, destroy anything they consider of no value: Others, inversely, believed that it was fundamental to eliminate ...


10

Like many of Borges's tales, The Library of Babel is meant more as a thought experiment than a realistic story. Don't overthink it. There's no mention anywhere in the story of any of various practicalities of life: where the librarians get food and how they eat how the plumbing for the toilets is operated and maintained how the librarian population is ...


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