68

No. They cared deeply about each other as friends, but there was never anything romantic in it. Holmes was asexual. He wasn't just uninterested in women, he was uninterested in romance. All emotions, and [love] particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing ...


31

In terms of explicit confirmation, the answer is a very solid no. At no point did any character, nor the omniscient narrator, identify Dumbledore's sexuality in simple terms. Signs and portents. Various writers have identified incidents and passages that might act as subtle indicators toward his sexuality. Note that all of these were spotted post-facto ...


27

As someone who rather likes the totally non-canonical idea of gay Edmund, there is really no textual evidence to support this idea and you are right to point out that it is extremely unlikely that Lewis intended the character to be gay. There's not even much of what most people would consider obvious gay subtext. We don't see Edmund longingly describe the ...


13

TL;DR: Lots. Introduction The post isn’t very clear about exactly what it’s asking, so I’m going to interpret it as asking the following questions: What does the term ‘bodice-ripper’ mean? In what context did the term originate? To what extent do these novels feature violence? How do readers and critics interpret the violence? Meaning The Oxford English ...


11

It should be noted that the Sherlock Holmes stories (with exception to "His Last Bow", "The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone", "The Adventure of the Lion's Mane", and "The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier") are entirely narrated by Dr. Watson, who could be unaware of his friend's feelings towards him if this is an unrequited love Holmes has for Watson. ...


4

It is worth noting in this conversation that Lewis had very level-headed opinions about homosexuality and did write directly about the subject outside of his children's fiction; in his private life, he was great friends with a gay man, also a devout Christian, who expressed his theory of homosexuality to Lewis and whose view Lewis seemed to accept as ...


3

No, there's absolutely no textual evidence for this. There's really not anything in the text that would come even vaguely close to supporting this. I suppose that you could say that, strictly speaking, the text doesn't say he's not either, though, but the fact remains that this simply can't be answered on the basis of textual analysis - it's simply not in ...


3

From a biological perspective, it isn't uncommon for those with vaginas to feel pain at first penetration, whether or not the hymen is responsible. All bodies are unique, and at minimum, a level of mild discomfort to actual pain is often difficult to avoid. Sometimes it's purely biological, and sometimes they maybe haven't learned how to avoid it yet - even ...


2

The hymen is a thin membrane which covers the entrance to the vagina. It can be broken during the first time a woman has penetrative intercourse, but that is not the only way. The hymen is not physically shaped the same way in every female body — it can be larger, smaller, or have several holes instead of one. It can be broken by vigorous physical activity,...


1

The key to understanding this is to see that the character of Maud herself is a metaphor for the male presumption of entitlement over women. She is taken by her Uncle from an environment where she is happy into his house, in order that he might use her eyes and hands to substitute for his own failing faculties in secretarial work on his pornography ...


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