78

No. They cared deeply about each other as friends, but there was never anything romantic in it. Holmes was asexual. He wasn't just uninterested in women, he was uninterested in romance. All emotions, and [love] particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing ...


33

In terms of explicit confirmation, the answer is a very solid no. At no point did any character, nor the omniscient narrator, identify Dumbledore's sexuality in simple terms. Signs and portents. Various writers have identified incidents and passages that might act as subtle indicators toward his sexuality. Note that all of these were spotted post-facto ...


29

As someone who rather likes the totally non-canonical idea of gay Edmund, there is really no textual evidence to support this idea and you are right to point out that it is extremely unlikely that Lewis intended the character to be gay. There's not even much of what most people would consider obvious gay subtext. We don't see Edmund longingly describe the ...


16

It should be noted that the Sherlock Holmes stories (with exception to "His Last Bow", "The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone", "The Adventure of the Lion's Mane", and "The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier") are entirely narrated by Dr. Watson, who could be unaware of his friend's feelings towards him if this is an unrequited love Holmes has for Watson. ...


13

TL;DR: Lots. Introduction The post isn’t very clear about exactly what it’s asking, so I’m going to interpret it as asking the following questions: What does the term ‘bodice-ripper’ mean? In what context did the term originate? To what extent do these novels feature violence? How do readers and critics interpret the violence? Meaning The Oxford English ...


10

There are a few gods and goddesses in ancient Greek mythology (assuming you count that as part of literature) who lead virgin lifestyles. Athena, Artemis, and Hestia come to mind as examples. Now of course, being a virgin doesn't necessarily imply being asexual - Artemis, for example, seems to recognise the idea of sexuality, and some stories even have it ...


7

There is a modern tradition of Antonio and Bassanio, and the rest of The Merchant of Venice, being interpreted in queer terms. A common starting point for this is the first line of the play. "In sooth, I know not why I am so sad", says Antonio. We don't either. He's rich, he has close friends, he seems to have no desire to marry. He goes to great ...


6

Perhaps a case can be made for Hermaphroditus. The son of Hermes and Aphrodite, he was a remarkably beautiful youth, but uninterested in sex. Or at least, the way Ovid tells it, "he did not know what love was"; and when the water nymph Salmacis offers herself to him, he spurns her. Salmacis hides until he strips to bathe in her lake. She then jumps in. ...


6

It is worth noting in this conversation that Lewis had very level-headed opinions about homosexuality and did write directly about the subject outside of his children's fiction; in his private life, he was great friends with a gay man, also a devout Christian, who expressed his theory of homosexuality to Lewis and whose view Lewis seemed to accept as ...


5

The song as a whole is written from the point of view of a woman who is having a relationship with another woman who, in turn, appears to be in an existing relationship with a man. I'm breaking walls down Is suggestive of an unapologetic stance on homosexual relationships. The term "wall" is a relatively common euphemism for a societal barrier rather ...


3

The hymen is a thin membrane which covers the entrance to the vagina. It can be broken during the first time a woman has penetrative intercourse, but that is not the only way. The hymen is not physically shaped the same way in every female body — it can be larger, smaller, or have several holes instead of one. It can be broken by vigorous physical activity,...


3

Sex between two men is implied, but not outright stated From the book (Basil to Dorian): "There was that wretched boy in the Guards who committed suicide. You were his great friend. There was Sir Henry Ashton, who had to leave England, with a tarnished name. You and he were inseparable." However, yes, it is clear that Basil is in love (or at ...


2

Humbert is primarily a hebephile, sexually attracted to young pubescent females. His relationships with adult females are entirely to facilitate access to their children, and they are unfulfilling. As to why he had hebephilic urges, it's not known in the real world if hebephilia is an acquired paraphilia, something inherent possibly with a genetic basis, or ...


2

No, there's absolutely no textual evidence for this. There's really not anything in the text that would come even vaguely close to supporting this. I suppose that you could say that, strictly speaking, the text doesn't say he's not either, though, but the fact remains that this simply can't be answered on the basis of textual analysis - it's simply not in ...


2

The Greek myths are seldom consistent. However in the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite, we read Muse, tell me the deeds of golden Aphrodite the Cyprian, who stirs up sweet passion in the gods and subdues the tribes of mortal men and birds that fly in air and all the many creatures that the dry land rears, and all that the sea: all these love the deeds of rich-...


2

There is a case to be made about the humanity itself (or some of it) being asexual at first. In some myths, Pandora is the first woman, created by Hephaestus for Zeus to punish humanity. Pandora's arrival and the subsequent disasters mark the end of the Golden Age of Man. What exactly were all those men doing before she came? While homosexual love was ...


2

There are many, many quotations that reveal the homosexual relationship. Why is Antonio sad? Because he is in love with a male prostitute and, in performance of anal sex with a client, Bassanio has injured himself and so is unable to satisfy Antonio's lust - nor earn money in to the bargain (explaining his need to borrow money and to marry a sugar mummy in ...


1

The key to understanding this is to see that the character of Maud herself is a metaphor for the male presumption of entitlement over women. She is taken by her Uncle from an environment where she is happy into his house, in order that he might use her eyes and hands to substitute for his own failing faculties in secretarial work on his pornography ...


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