46

I dispute your claim that the Turing test, or Turing's article, is about gender. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence; I see no hint in Turing's article that the test is about gender. If you think that it is, it is up to you to come up with evidence why that is a reasonable conclusion. Therefore, the only thing that is answerable in your ...


17

Actually, Alan Turing had expressed his ideas about the Turing Test before without using gender...at least, according to Wikipedia. In 1948, Alan Turing wrote in an unpublished manuscript: It is not difficult to devise a paper machine which will play a not very bad game of chess. Now get three men as subjects for the experiment. A, B and C. A and C are to ...


9

Turing is talking about gender purely to make it easier to discuss A and B, I think. He was a gay man who didn't suffer fools gladly; gender wasn't a point of discrimination for him beyond what living in the early part of the 20th century would make any white cis male. He was interested in thinking, in puzzles, in how the machines worked, in creating a ...


7

It is important to bear in mind that the Turing test is really an illustration rather than a attempt to prove anything. Bear in mind also that when this statement was made the idea that a computer could successfully imitate a human was a very distant possibility so he is very much talking about an overall concept rather than the nuances of its possible ...


3

It is perfectly possible to analyse a scientific text such as a journal article from a literary point of view. This implies looking at aspects such as word choice, the description of the research method, authorial presence and other stylistic aspects. When one compares scientific articles from the seventeenth century from articles from today, it is obvious ...


3

This answer rides on the coattails of Gilles and Tariq Ali, who have both provided informative and insightful answers, and addresses a follow-up question concerning the meaning of this paragraph from the paper: We now ask the question, "What will happen when a machine takes the part of A in this game?" Will the interrogator decide wrongly as often when ...


2

I will try to approch this from a different angle. One of your comments: I don't think this answers the question. My question is, in a paper about computers, why is the first thing that Turing talks about gender, and why is the category Turing testing for really the male-female binary instead of the human-computer binary. .... I want to know why Turing ...


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