10

Short answer: Egil's saga is not particularly more interested in legal matters than similar sagas. I do not know what other sagas are being referenced in the question, but one should recognise that there are several types of sagas. The more important ones are sagas about Icelanders (Íslendingasögur), sagas about Kings (Konungasögur), and legendary sagas (...


9

The original text is: Fremfor alt må vi gjøre forplantningsspørsmålet etisk relevant. Man endevender en mynt under valgets kvide, før man gir den til tiggeren. Men et barn slænger man ut i den kosmiske råskap uten å blunke. P W Zapffe, Essays og epistler, page 161, last paragraph A literal translation would be something like: They turn the coin in the ...


8

There are great variations of how trolls are portrayed, but it is not primarily a matter of national literature. I will be focusing on Sweden and Norway, where I know the traditions best. First, we should note that trolls range in appearance from some that are quite human-like, to the point that they are able to move in human society and can only be spotted ...


7

First, I'd like to note that my knowledge on English verse is not as good as of Norse. Thus I will start with a description of Norse verse, and then try to compare with what I know of English verse. Norse verse Since Tolkien is obviously talking about the verse found in eddic poetry (as opposed to the kind of scaldic poetry that where aimed at Kings and ...


6

It's a geographical feature: a stony hill with a cairn. A beacon doesn't have to be a man-made signal: the word can mean just a "high hill or other easily distinguishable object", e.g. one which can act as a landmark and provide guidance for sailors or wanderers. See, for instance, the Brecon Beacons. I searched for "Hallbjorn's beacon" on Google; most of ...


6

Properly, the name Edda refers only to one work: Snorri's Edda, a work on Norse poetics, including the background in mythology necessary to write and understand such. The name probably comes from an Icelandic word for (great) grandmother, but there are also other theories. The so-called Poetic Edda, also known as Sæmundar Edda (from Sæmund the Learned) or ...


3

Several languages have a similar expression involving "turning over" coins. For example, the German expression "jedes Geldstück zweimal umdrehen" (or jeden Pfennig zweimal umdrehen) literally means "turning over each piece of money twice" and the Dutch expression "ieder dubbeltje drie keer omdraaien" literally means "turning over each coin three times". (In ...


3

Yes he was. This is confirmed on the Moomin Series official website: Snufkin was inspired by Tove Jansson herself, her brother Lars, but above all Tove’s boyfriend from the beginning of the 1940’s, Atos Wirtanen. Jansson claimed (see page at end of answer) that Snufkin's love of nature was reflective of her own fascination with the natural world (which ...


2

As you have already found out, if texts are presented side by side, these are known as parallel text; in the case of translations, the usual term is bilingual parallel text. Bilingual parallel texts can be used as a language learning resource; see for example the article 6 Spots to Pick Up Texts in the Bilingual Parallel Universe on FluentU. There are ...


2

The Hávamál ("The High One's [=Odin's] Lay") in this 1908 translation edition of the Elder Edda has these bits of advice and reminiscence, which might be what you are after. A better burthen no man bears on the way than much good sense; that is thought better than riches in a strange place; such is the recourse of the indigent. A worse provision ...


2

I'll caveat this with the fact that I have not read the work in question and I'm going to some extent off the OP, Mami's comments now edited into the question. Specifically the comment: there is no mention of people having up-normal powers within the people"in the context" so it's not logic to assume that people without "specific powers" ...


1

We are never explicitly told how he knows this. Karl says that when Jonatan first tells him about Nangiyala, it is in a manner as if "everyone knows about it". Then the subject is dropped. We are also not told how he knows about the existence of Nangilima, where those that die in Nangiyala goes. However, there is another interpretation available, which is ...


1

Well, the rabbit is described as our universe, pulled out of a magician's hat, where the magician is God. Philosophers, discoverers, they are the ones Sophie says built the Tower of Babel, or climbed to the tip of the rabbit's hairs. She thus represents the Tower of Babel as a great achievement. Sophie then represents God, or the magician, as wishing to not ...


1

I believe that Sophie and Alberto became real as they crawled to the tip of the rabbit's fur. The more questioning they became, and the farther along they crawled, the more real they became. They no longer said just the words the major put in their mouths, and acted just as the major wished. And this fits in with Alberto's view of philosophy - with the ...


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