6

Taking the elements of style in turn: (A) Almost every concrete noun in the poem is used metaphorically, including door, chariots, gate, emperor, mat, nation, valve. (B) You are right that “I’ve known her close the Valves of her attention — Like Stone” contains a simile. There's some ambiguity and ellipsis here: you can read it as “I’ve known her close the ...


6

Let's look at this claim in context. It comes from SAT II Success: Literature (2002) by Margaret Moran and W. Frances Holder. This is a test-taking guide for the SAT Subject Test in Literature, which is a multiple-choice standardized test given to college applicants in the United States. So the claim has to be understood in context as a helpful piece of ...


5

Your understanding of the two words is correct. In fact, the dictionary defines reverent as: Feeling or showing deep and solemn respect. So the difference is entirely one of strength of feeling. Yet that difference is enough to separate the two options given for your answer. The poem is broken into two verses - I took the liberty of editing your ...


4

It's a simile. A simile is a direct comparison and if we note that we have: The soul ... unmoved ... like stone We see we have a simile. This reading is corroborated by reading the rest of the poem: a stone is unworldly and unaffected by the pomp and circumstance of the world. Likewise (Emily's) soul, presumably at the point of time when Emily wrote ...


4

the title “Holy Thursday” implies a religious context, making ["Blake appeals to his readers' faith"] also correct. That sentence from the textbook betrays a remarkable lack of understanding of poetry and of Blake's poetry in particular. Just because the title refers to a religious date, doesn't at all mean the author is appealing to his readers' faith. I ...


3

In the phrase, "this man's art", "art" can mean "skill", "learning", "cunning", "magic" or "artifice". In Shakespeare's time, the word "art" usually refers to capabilities that have nothing to do with art in the present-day sense, so option C is what educationalists would call a "plausible destractor" for people who are not very familiar with Shakespeare's ...


3

The book is correct; the last line uses the image a stone but, strictly speaking, not a simile. When Robert Burns writes, "O My Luve's like a red, red rose", he makes a comparison between two things: his love and a rose. In Book IV of Paradise Lost, Milton wrote, (...) As when a prowling wolf, Whom hunger drives to seek new haunt for prey, Watching ...


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