15

It seems so, yes. After the game played between Death and Life-in-Death, in which the latter wins the soul of the Ancient Mariner while the former claims all his crewmates, the Mariner is left all alone upon the ship. He is driven to distraction by the corpses, but says he cannot die: Fear not, fear not, thou Wedding-Guest! This body dropt not down. ...


15

You are correct in that the boards are the planks of wood from which the ship is constructed. Although nautically, "boards" is more often used to refer to the decking than to the hull. In hot dry conditions, wood will shrink. It was common in the 18th Century for wooden sailing ships travelling from Europe to the tropics to suffer shrinkage of the deck ...


13

Here is the verse in additional context: Ah! well a-day! what evil looks Had I from old and young!Instead of the cross, the albatross About my neck was hung. Why is the albatross there? Well, it is evidently taking place of "the cross". In the first two lines of this stanza, he speaks of how the people give him "evil looks", that is, disapproving ...


4

Neither. Coleridge is referring to his own reservations about some of Wordsworth's poems. The context makes this clear: A friend whose talents I hold in the highest respect, but whose judgment and strong sound sense I have had almost continued occasion to revere, making the usual complaints to me concerning both the style and subjects of Mr. Wordsworth's ...


4

TL;DR: Coleridge means the cause of the criticism of the poetry of Southey, Wordsworth, and himself, which he believes was Wordsworth’s preface to Lyrical Ballads. The background to this passage is the critical reaction to the work of Robert Southey, William Wordsworth, and Coleridge himself. He says that the critics wrongly identified these poets as “a new ...


4

Note that he doesn't write that one "sieves nectar in a sieve," but rather that one attempts to draw nectar in a sieve, as one would draw water from a well. See one of Merriam-Webster's definitions: to bring or get from a source While it's true that impurities may be sifted out of the nectar in this fashion, if the purpose of putting it there was to ...


3

The comparison of the albatross to the cross alludes to the cross not as a symbol of faith, but as a symbol of penance. Remember, Christ was executed on the cross. When the captain killed the bird, the wind calmed and no rain fell, condemning the entire crew to death. The crew hung the dead bird around the captain's neck as a reminder of what he'd done: ...


3

The sentence is part of a letter addressed to Coleridge that the poet cites in its entirety near the end of Chapter XIII of Biographia Literaria. In that chapter, Coleridge discusses his theory of the imagination; these thoughts were part of a longer essay that Coleridge planned to publish as the introduction to a volume of his poems. The author of the ...


3

I think just comparing two poems to try to figure out the difference between Romanticism and Symbolism is very misleading. I believe that Symbolist poets wrote poems which spanned the whole spectrum from Romanticism to Symbolism. Poetry Foundation describes Symbolism as: They rejected their predecessors’ tendency toward naturalism and realism, believing ...


2

In the final stanza, the poet writes: Could I revive within me Her symphony and song, To such a deep delight 'twould win me, That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome! those caves of ice! It appears the speaker longs for (or is even envious of) Khan's somewhat mythic abilities described in the poem, namely the power to ...


2

We can reconstruct, I think, what the story must have been, from Coleridge’s brief précis of it. Perhaps it was something like this: A painter was present at an exhibition of his works and overheard a spectator say, “This picture has too many black spots.” The painter was mortified and worked all night to correct the picture, but on the next day the same ...


2

The publication date of the Biographia (1817) made me wonder if this was anything to do with early photography. It turns out that Thomas Wedgwood was carrying out early experiments with sensitised leather and paper, creating what were then known as 'shadow pictures'. His friend Humphry Davy wrote and published in 1802, in the Journal of the Royal ...


2

This is not an exact answer to the original question. TROTAM was first published in Bristol in 1798 in a collection by Coleridge and Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads. As one might expect, the very first edition is rare, and subsequent editions numerous. The earliest version I have found on-line is of a 1798 London edition. It titles the poem as ""THE RIME OF ...


1

If you continue the meter to the next line, you find it is unstressed (From), completing the trochee from the previous line's stressed syllable (short). Now, if you continue, you might find another problem with the ending of the second line, mainly that it is stressed. However, notice the next line, which starts discussing the spondee, two long stressed ...


1

It was very difficult to find analysis let alone explanation of this poem so I apologise for any unsupported reasoning. It is in trochaic tetrameter, because there are four trochees in the first line, as you highlighted in your copy (numbers indicate stress number): TRO(1)chee TRIPS(2) from LONG(3) to SHORT(4) With scansion symbols it looks like this (- = ...


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