19

Something like a duke, and the title wasn't all that special. The English word "prince" is translated from the Russian "knyaz (князь)", which could be used either to denote a member of the royal family or more commonly a member of the nobility. Men directly related to the Tsar were usually called Velikiy Knyaz or Grand Prince instead. &...


16

Nothing proves it. The closest are Dunya's accusations, including her knowledge that he both discussed poison with her, AND went to get that poison. "...Не твой револьвер, а Марфы Петровны, которую ты убил, злодей! У тебя ничего не было своего в ее доме. Я взяла его, как стала подозревать, на что ты способен." "Ты жену отравил, я знаю, ты сам убийца!…...


15

Apparently, this was a coincidence Googling took me to LiveJournal, where someone was wondering about the same thing. According to the guy over there, Karpov was only 11 when the book was originally written, and Kasparov wasn't even born - not to mention that his surname when born was Weinstein. Finally, some Word of God from an interview with Комсомольская ...


14

This is an interesting question. I don't have a definitive answer, but here is some pertinent information. In the foreword to the book, the fictional (and pathologically self-important) Kinbote suggests reading the notes first, then the poem (with the help of the notes), and then the notes again: Other notes, arranged in a running commentary, will ...


14

Some parts of the text suggest she was thirteen ... I found this article, which summarises an analysis by Russian sexologist A. Kotrovsky and columnist E. Tchernych and concludes that Tatiana was probably only thirteen: Pushkin uses the word otrokovitsa. This hard-to-pronounce Russian word is usually translated as maiden but in Pushkin’s time otrok (male)...


14

It's intended to be ironic. In his preface to the second edition, Lermontov criticises the readers who - like you - took the title at face value and interpreted it to mean Pechorin was really being modelled as a hero: The preface to a book serves the double purpose of prologue and epilogue. It affords the author an opportunity of explaining the object of ...


13

Firstly, why there are Greek names in Russia. Russia, being a Christian Orthodox country, had strong historical and cultural connections with Greece. So, many Russian names are of Greek origin. Most of them are archaic nowadays, but some are very common. Secondly, in the XIX century, there was a somewhat strong distinction between "noble" names and "plebs'" ...


12

After intensive search I found it. Writer: Sever Gansovsky. Story: Demon of history (1967). And I found Russian text: Демон истории.


12

The word "propaganda" at that time was not understood the way we tend to understand it today. It is more or less safe to understand it based on its etymology, i.e. based on the verb "propagate" - propaganda: "A concerted set of messages aimed at influencing the opinions or behaviour of large numbers of people." - just remove the ...


11

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, author of such works as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, was a devout Orthodox Catholic from a very young age. He is reported to have, at a young age, recited prayers to guests to their great amazement. He is also said to have been greatly affected by various Bible selections. Through his time in the military ...


10

I'm not well acquainted with most of Dostoevsky's writings, but The House of the Dead stands out as a controversial case. In it, we see the character Isay Fomitch Bumstein, who worked as both a jeweler and a pawnbroker (close enough to the stereotypical Jewish moneylender). Apart from his job, Dostoevsky's physical characterization of Bumstein is not quite ...


10

The original Russian version does not use any made-up or composite word for "anisotropic". "Anisotropic" is a real world present in English language; it is used in science, as well as technology. Britannica defines it as following: Anisotropy, in physics, the quality of exhibiting properties with different values when measured along axes in different ...


10

We don't know whether it was an arbalest or a crossbow. To quote (for the lack of a better source) Wikipedia: A large weapon, the arbalest had a steel prod ("bow"). Emphasis mine Taking that as the trait that distinguishes an arbalest from a crossbow, we... gain nothing. There is no mention of arbalests in the original Russian version, and ...


9

They don't bring anyone to Earth. The persons of interest - scientists, astronomers, medics, artisans, poets, you name it - are not sent to Earth. They are re-routed to kingdoms that value their respective fields more that Arkanar (which is pretty much any kingdom out there). Bagheer of Kissen, accused of lunacy bordering on treason, had been thrown in a ...


9

Not really, unless you're willing to allow a lot of stretches and assumptions. We could scrape a motivation for Arata to have ordered the abduction. Firstly, it could be argued he had the motive: he has asked Rumata multiple times for "lightnings", to crush the oppressors of common folk. Rumata always refused, justifying the refusal by the very ...


9

When Rodion says he could be wrong, he means his words for the previous sentence: Hurrah for Sonia! What a mine they've dug there! And they're making the most of it! Yes, they are making the most of it! They've wept over it and grown used to it. Man grows used to everything, the scoundrel! So he says that man must be a scoundrel to accept the fact ...


9

Where the translator (Constance Garnett) used “secret police”, the Russian text is “Третьего отделения” (tretyego otdeleniya) meaning “third section”, that is, the Third Section of His Imperial Majesty’s Own Chancellery, the secret police department of the Imperial Russian government from 1826 to 1880. Its headquarters were near the Panteleymonovsky Bridge ...


8

SPOILERS AHEAD! This answer may contain spoilers including hints to the major plot points of the book; sprinkled all over. References: all Beria facts below are basically from Russian Beria Wiki page unless otherwise stated. First, political parallels. Don Reba's role in the state. His role in the book was described by many as "the grey cardinal" - ...


8

All three of them are trying to seem more grown up than they really are. Running from their boarding school? With crossbows blazing? That doesn't sound like trying to be more grown up than they really are at all. We don't know how old they are at this time, but I'll make an educated guess and say 12-16 years old, the right time when running away towards ...


8

First of all, as is usual with user-generated content, Wikipedia has glaring errors here. Here's what English Wikipedia page that caused you to ask the question says: Without Weapons (Без оружия, Bez oruzhia) also known as A Man from a Distant Star (Человек с далёкой звезды, Chelovek s dalyokoy zvezdy) was a play created by the Strugatsky brothers ...


8

Nabokov sometimes used translations into English as an opportunity to touch up his work, but sometimes he didn't. Below are a few case studies. Maybe the best example of Nabokov making changes is Laughter in the Dark, the author's rewrite of Winifred Roy's 1935 translation of the Russian Kamera Obskura. Colapinto has a piece in the New Yorker called How ...


8

The subsequent text pretty clearly provides the context; and it's the one you suggested ("after they kill me for possessing it") — Напугал... Вам приходилось когда-нибудь жечь собственных детей? Что вы знаете о страхе, благородный дон!.. ... Гур Сочинитель вдруг принялся шептать так тихо, что Румата едва слышал его сквозь чавканье и гул голосов: — А ...


8

Jah is a god of Rastafari. He is often mentioned is late- / post-soviet era songs. For example "Джа на нашей стороне" by Гражданская Оборона or "Единственный дом (Джа даст нам всё)" by Boris Grebenshikov. As some users have doubts about this Jah being Jah Rastafari, here are some examples from other Russian rock songs (all these band are ...


8

This story was surprisingly difficult to find: partly because Andreyev apparently wrote quite a number of stories about murderers and/or lunatic asylums, partly because there are so many different English translations of the title of the story. It's this story, written in 1902 and entitled "Мысль" ("Mysl") in the original Russian - a title which has been ...


8

It is indeed end of November in the actual Russian text and all my research so far shows that this is a genuine author's mistake. "Он исписал альбомы девочек стихами и нотами и, не простившись ни с кем из своих знакомых, отослав, наконец, все сорок три тысячи и получив расписку Долохова, уехал в конце ноября догонять полк, который уже был в Польше." At ...


8

What exactly is he referring to? He's most probably referring to the events in Russian history when Russia was on a brink of ceasing to exist as a state. There were a number of grave moments throughout the centuries, to name a few: Mongol invasion of Kievan Rus (XIII-XV centuries) Смутное Время ("Time of Troubles", as Wiki puts it) (late XVI - ...


8

Колокол (Kolokol meaning “bell”) was a mid-19th century dissident Russian-language newspaper, printed in London and Geneva to evade Russian state censorship. Commenting on the lines of verse quoted by Kolya: Long will you remember The house at the Chain bridge Victor Terras writes: These two lines are from a widely known antigovernment satire, repeatedly ...


7

Notably this isn't the Count's first stroke. It is, in fact his sixth. Doctors have known for centuries that victims of stroke can become constipated and suffer from fecal impaction as a result of loss of muscular function in the colon. This can become highly painful and ultimately will lead to bowel infection. A small dose of a purgative such as Cream of ...


7

Apart from the quote by Silenus, I can remember two more germanophobic passages. The first one is about Fyodor's student (and it mentions humor): Он был самодоволен, рассудителен, туп и по-немецки невежественен, т.е. относился ко всему, чего не знал, скептически. Твердо считая, что смешная сторона вещей давным-давно разработана там, где ей и полагается ...


7

Here is a passage from The Gift which depicts two Germans as brutish and indifferent to human suffering. Yasha's death had its most painful effect on his father.... Meanwhile nothing stopped with Yasha's death and many interesting things were happening: in Russia one observed the spread of abortions and the revival of summer houses; in England there were ...


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