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It is the deliciousness of the honey that leads you to gorge on it until you can't face it anymore. Deliciousness leads to eating too much of it, therefore the deliciousness is the problem. You wouldn't eat too much if it wasn't delicious, after all. Now, I hesitate to use Reddit as an authoritative source, but for an anecdotal demonstration of the principle,...


5

In this context, withal means something very close to with. Some context and a paraphrase would be helpful. Mercutio has challenged Tybalt to fight. Tybalt asks what Mercutio wants. Mercutio replies: Good king of cats! All I want is one of your nine lives. I intend to make bold with it. Depending on how you respond to that, I may also beat your other eight ...


3

In his edition of Romeo and Juliet for the New Cambridge Shakespeare (Cambridge University Press, 1984), G. Blakemore Evans points out that the idea express in Friar Lawrence's words ("The sweetest honey / Is loathsome in his own deliciousness" [1]) was proverbial in Shakespeare's time. This is something the two existing answers have overlooked. ...


3

It seems to me that a large part of the above question can be answered by the context provided by Shakespeare, which implies “eating too quickly,” as well as eating too much. These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume. The sweetest honey. Is loathsome in his own deliciousness And in ...


1

Below is the entry for "withal" in Skeat's glossary: withal = with, as placed at the end of the sentence. As You Like It, iii. 2. 238; used in the sense of likewise, besides, at the same time, Bible, 1 Kings xix. 1; Ps. cxli. 10; Acts xxv. 27; 'Though he be merry, yet withal he's honest', Taming Shrew, iii. 2. 25; Bacon, Essay 58; phr. to do ...


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