13

Yep. Stevenson writes in his A Chapter on Dreams, which you can see a book scan at that link, and a text version at Project Gutenburg: Well, as regards the dreamer, I can answer that, for he is no less a person than myself;—as I might have told you from the beginning, only that the critics murmur over my consistent egotism;—and as I am positively forced to ...


8

Stevenson's admission of the earlier stories and authors he'd plagiarised borrowed ideas from comes in My First Book - his little-known preface to Treasure Island, first published in McClure's Magazine in September 1894. First Stevenson acknowledges very readily some minor ideas and motifs taken from other writers: It is not to be wondered at, for stolen ...


8

TL;DR: The opening chapters of Treasure Island make it clear that the "Admiral Benbow" must be within a few miles of Lynmouth in Devon. Stevenson wrote a detailed account of the writing of Treasure Island. Although this does not mention the "Admiral Benbow" or its location, it does include the passage: … how troublesome the moon is! I have come to grief ...


7

William Ernest Henley. Per Andrzej Diniejko, in William Ernest Henley: A Biographical Sketch: Robert Louis Stevenson modelled the most famous pirate in literature — Treasure Island's Long John Silver with his wooden leg — on his crippled friend Henley. Doris Alexander, in Creating Literature Out of Life, devotes a chapter to Stevenson's creative process ...


6

TL;DR: The “double being” of Jekyll and Hyde is a floating signifier, so a Scottish interpretation of the novella could be made. But no-one has done so yet! Wikipedia and James Campbell are mistaken on this point. Floating signifier Stevenson wrote that the theme of Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is that strong sense of man’s double being which must ...


5

Billy Bones (first mate) Confirmed from his own mouth: "I was first mate, I was, old Flint's first mate, and I'm the on'y one as knows the place. He gave it me at Savannah, when he lay a-dying, like as if I was to now, you see." -- Chapter 3, "The Black Spot" Long John Silver (quartermaster) Confirmed from his own mouth: "No, not I,” said ...


5

TL;DR: Stevenson didn’t intend to put an anti-science agenda into Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and I don’t see how to make a convincing case for finding it there. Introduction The question is ambiguous as written: I am not sure whether you mean to ask whether it is possible to interpret the novel as anti-science, or whether Stevenson intended this. ...


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