15

Yes, there are quite a few, including "Mending Wall" "The Death of the Hired Man" "Birches" "Out, Out—" That said, most of these do have a continuous meter. Blank verse has such a meter, while free verse does not. Frost once said I'd sooner write free verse as play tennis with the net down. A review by William O'Donnell says that Frost is "unequalled" ...


13

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. Quotes have a way of taking on a life of their own. These lines, the last three lines of Frost's The Road Not Taken, have been endlessly quoted by many people: as epigraphs in their books, on their personal web pages, and so on. And why not? ...


10

First let's take a quick look at what Robert Frost himself said about this poem: “One stanza of “The Road Not Taken” was written while I was sitting on a sofa in the middle of England. [It] was as found three or four years later, and I couldn’t bear not to finish it. I wasn’t thinking about myself there, but about a friend who had gone off to war, a ...


9

Wikipedia's List of poems by Robert Frost includes it in a collection published in 1937. Robert Frost and the New England Renaissance by George Monteiro claims: "Two Tramps in Mud Time" was first published in 1934. At the time Frost remarked that he considered the poem to be "against having hobbies." So, presumably it was written in (or before) 1934.


7

A Roadside Stand describes a small-time farmer trying to sell their produce from a stall by a busy road. The farmer is poor, wanting only a small slice of city wealth, and feels bitter that drivers won't even look at the stand, let alone stop and buy something. In this context the "trusting sorrow" is a neat encapsulation to express what is described over ...


6

The trees are covered in ice, and "as the breeze rises", they make clicking sounds as different ice-covered parts of the tree collide. The breeze (or "stir") cracks the "enamel" - the ice covering, and so as it falls off, the many different colours - white, green grey - are revealed.


6

@muru's answer is once again correct, but I do feel there's a little additional nuance to explore here. Frost is actually mocking himself with the modifier "gently." If someone offers to kill you, you're unlikely to care whether or not they are "gentle" about it. When Frost puts himself in the place of the prospective victim, he can finally seen how ...


5

"N" and "S" are letters that are frequently mistakenly written backwards by children, and others of a low level of literacy. For that reason, if written on backwards on a sign they denote a barely literate writer. Sometimes letters are deliberately reversed to give a "folksy" touch to a piece of writing, but in this case, Frost explicitly calls them "...


5

To own, from Merriam-Webster: transitive verb a : to have or hold as property : possess b : to have power or mastery over wanted to own his own life : to acknowledge to be true, valid, or as claimed : admit  own a debt Here, it's not used in the first sense, but in the second. Frost is saying that he can't help but ...


4

As @muru described, owned has two meanings. The more familiar meaning denotes possession, but there's a less common secondary meaning of "admitting something is true," sometimes used in the construction "own up (to the truth)." Frost is using the term primarily in the second sense, but with strong connotations of the first. In other words he is both ...


4

The author could be alluding to Shakespeare's Macbeth (Act IV, Scene 1, with the witches) : A shew of eight Kings, and Banquo last, with a glasse in his hand. Macb. Thou art too like the Spirit of Banquo: Down: Thy Crowne do's seare mine Eye-bals. And thy haire Thou other Gold-bound-brow, is like the first: A third, is like the former. ...


4

Your reading of the poem makes sense. It might help to know that the dark trees are symbolizing the future in this poem. The second line tells us that these trees rarely show a breeze. This means that we cannot predict the future. In the fourth line, Frost expresses his wish that those dark trees in the first line were stretched away to the edge of doom. ...


3

This is a variant on the longstanding critique of charity/welfare as robbing people of meaningful work and giving them a suffocating idleness instead. By being given charity instead of work, the poor in Frost's poem sleep all day instead of spending their time productively. The end result is that they cannot sleep peacefully at night, the way one does ...


3

The this refers to the preceding phrase or dialogue; crossly means gruffly or with ill grace. The repetition is purely for emphasis. The meaning, from context, is that people who live along the big highways resent the traffic. In the first case, although many of them are more than willing to sell produce, or a painting, to the passing motorists (...


3

TL;DR: Feet are arbitrary conventions in English verse, so you can scan the poem however you like, but Frost’s description of the metre is simpler than Gillespie’s. Thesis The linked blog post (by poet Patrick Gillespie) describes two theories regarding scansion: Most people divide lines into feet when they read. In this division, most people prefer feet ...


3

Whatever be the method, it's not likely to be a slow death. A slow, drawn-out death would only prolong the suffering, thus defeating the purpose of relieving the pain of the victim. Frost is talking about euthanasia here, and euthanasia is usually seen as humane, unlike say capital punishment. I don't think Frost is as concerned about the means of killing ...


2

"Not one but hung limp" does not mean "all except one hung limp" (even though "but" in the sense of "except" exists). In fact it means "there was not one that did not hang limp" or "all hung limp (without exception). This is why the verse continues, "not one was left For him to conquer". This is an old usage of "but". You can find it, for example, in ...


2

In Sonnet 116 of Shakespeare, we also find the phrase "the edge of doom": Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. Indeed, it suggests "the end of time", since according to the sonnet, love could not be ...


2

Because he wants to end it all Taken at face value, Robert Frost's Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening is a pastoral poem describing a rider's pause on a journey to admire some scenery. As such, it is superbly crafted, and with few blemishes. It stands equal to Wordsworth's Daffodils, inasmuch as it is picturesque and enormously popular. The poem makes few ...


1

The narrator stops because he wants to enjoy the scenery of the forest. Assuming that the journey the narrator has to make is an extensive one (miles to go before I sleep), the narrator wants to take a small break to watch the natural wonder of the snowfall and the beauty of the trees. There are several lines that support this idea: To watch his woods ...


1

I read in a commentary somewhere that Frost effectively pulled a fast one with this poem, inasmuch as he appears to engage in weighty thought about making a life-changing decision, whereas in fact, he couldn't care less and makes what is almost a random choice. If he had been honest, the subject of the poem would have been his indifference to the actual ...


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