12

Brenci PatiƱo makes the point that the two women, Modesta and the indigenous woman, are "pitted against each other" by the social structure around them. They "share similar experiences of oppression," but must fight each other for survival. Modesta, as a servant to a wealthy family, was abused and made to live in fear. So the specific incident, in which ...


8

Whitewashing is distinct but related things. Changing an existing non-white character to be a white one. Using white characters in a setting that would typically have non-whites. White actors, directors, writers, singers (i.e. content creators) receiving the majority of awards and accolades. The fact that it is white people being accused off this action ...


8

At the time, there were many Jewish bankers/moneylenders, so moneylenders were probably often portrayed as Jews. For a very long time, the Jews have been associated with banking and money. There are a few reasons, such as that there were a lot of Jewish bankers after the 11th century. In The Encyclopedia Judaica, in their article on Banking and Bankers, in ...


7

This is a strange question for a number of reasons. First of all, it's quite broad and meandering. There's a lot of assumptions in the question that aren't correct and need to be corrected. I mention this as way of explaining and apologizing for the meandering style of this answer. The central character is a reimagining of Shakespeare's Caliban, a ...


6

Sorry to be brief, I'm writing this on a phone (more to follow later). Short answer: for a long time, usury rules generally forbade Catholics from lending money at interest to other Catholics. Similarly, Jews generally couldn't charge interest to Jews, but they could lend money to Christians at interest. (Both were basing the prohibition on a number of ...


4

I love Anthony Trollope for his characters but, sadly, he often characterizes Jews in late 19 century London as prosperous but dangerous moneylenders to the elite ("The Eustace Diamonds" and "The Duke's Children"). Some of his least sympathetic characters, who are probably Jewish, although it is not totally clear to the reader, are psychopaths: Ferdinand ...


3

In this case, whitewashing is basically exactly what it sounds like. It's taking a canonically PoC (Person of Colour) character and portraying them as white instead, either through art or film or fanfic or what have you. Basically, taking away any reference to their race and making them look/act like a white person, even though the canonical media states/...


2

It's referring to the 1920s. Note the reference to the book's publication as "one of the last of all through the thirties", "one year before our entry into the last world war". The prevailing view towards the African-American in the '20s was one of patronising comfortable superiority, but Baldwin is arguing that the Great Depression changed all this, and the ...


1

In another part of that same book (I cannot find the page number in Google books), the author says this speech was at Portland University. "Toni Morrison, one of the foremost storytellers of my lifetime, captured the futility of 'celebrating' black history, with a powerful speech in 1975. 'It's important to know ... the very serious function of racism, ...


1

My answer about the pronouns in "Shift" focused on the opposition between nature (and a person's nature and roots) on the one hand, and technology-based civilisation on the other. My interpretation of the use of pronouns is based on the claim that Caliban tried to get away from his original environment and ignored his nature and roots. The story contains ...


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