31

This looks like a spoof of the quote from The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien: Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. It comes from The Fellowship of the Ring: 'But it is said: Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. The choice is yours: to go or wait.' 'And it ...


23

This is a quote from an interview he gave in 1931. Traigo preparados cuatro libros. De teatro. De poesía. Y de impresiones neoyorkinas, el que puede titularse : la ciudad, interpretación personal, abstracción impersonal, sin lugar ni tiempo dentro de aquella ciudad mundo. Un símbolo patético : Sufrimiento. Pero del revés, sin dramatismo. Es una puesta en ...


22

This is from Émile Montégut’s translation of Romeo and Juliet: Roméo. — Hélas! pourquoi faut-il que l’amour, dont la vue est toujours couverte d’un bandeau, puisse sans yeux trouver le chemin qui mène à ses caprices? Où allons-nous dîner? — Hélas de moi! — Quelle querelle aviez-vous ici tout à l’heure? mais non, ne me la racontez pas; car j’ai tout appris....


14

Actually? Neither. In conclusion, QI believes that this saying was introduced by Richard Grenier who was attempting to provide a pithy representation of an idea he ascribed to George Orwell. Later writers and speakers turned his phrase into a quotation and directly attached it to Orwell. Over time variants were constructed with modified phrasing. ...


13

Since you say the quote isn't exact, the best I can remember is the following from Romeo and Juliet (emphasis mine): Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still, Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will! Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here? Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all. Here's much to do with hate, but more with love. ...


12

Yep. Stevenson writes in his A Chapter on Dreams, which you can see a book scan at that link, and a text version at Project Gutenburg: Well, as regards the dreamer, I can answer that, for he is no less a person than myself;—as I might have told you from the beginning, only that the critics murmur over my consistent egotism;—and as I am positively forced ...


11

He found it in The Murder on the Links, and he made that statement in Lord Edgware Dies. In chapter 7 of Lord Edgware Dies, Poirot mentions this: ‘I found a clue once,’ said Poirot dreamily. ‘But since it was four feet long instead of four centimetres no one would believe in it.’ (chapter 7) This is in reference to The Murder on the Links, where a 4 ...


11

I have read all of Shakespeare's works and the quote does not even sound like a Shakespeare quote. Most of Shakespeare's works are written in a type of verse known as iambic pentameter and the quote cannot be scanned as a succession of iambs. Of course, Shakespeare also used prose in his plays, but I couldn't find any examples of the words "robust, "ordeal"...


10

This quote has a long history and its true origins are obscure. I began my investigation of this question by doing a web search for quote speaking truth wants publish journalism marketing. In the results, among a lot of serious discussions about journalism, was a Goodreads page which attributes the following quote to George Orwell: “Journalism is ...


10

The quote is likely to be a slight variation of the following: In a sense, one can never read the book that the author originally wrote, and one can never read the same book twice. This is from Wilson's The Triple Thinkers (Amazon link). You can see the section of interest in the Preface, page ix. Conveniently, the preview includes that page, so you can ...


10

TL;DR: The quote comes from a 1917 work by William James. James says Goethe wrote it in 1824, but in fact it was first published in 1836 (in German) by Johann Eckermann, as part of Eckermann's autobiographical recollections of Goethe's conversations with him, this particular conversation taking place in 1824. However, the version given by James may not be ...


10

Scott made his Saxons drink ‘ale’, not ‘beer’. In doing so he was following the Saxons’ own usage: the word ‘beer’ was “rare, except in poetry, and it seems to have become common only in the 16th century” (OED). So you are looking for this piece of dialogue: “Thou art an ass,” replied one of the thieves; “three quarts of double ale had rendered thee as ...


9

Hypsipyle is a lost or fragmentary play written around 410 BC by the Greek playwright Euripedes. This particular fragment might have survived from its inclusion in Book IV of Symposiacs by the Greek/Roman biographer and essayist Plutarch, who lived between AD 46 – AD 120. So this is likely a fragment of Hypsipyle that we only know about because Plutarch ...


9

The first part of the phrase, "every man has his price" is apparently a mis-quote of a remark by Robert Walpole, made in 1734, that "I know the price of every man in this house (i.e. the House of Commons) except three", although it is believed that the phrase was in common use before this time. The oldest combination with "all the gold in ... couldn't buy ...


8

The quote appears to be taken from a poem by the emperor Taizong (personal name Li Shimin) of China. Wikipedia says that Emperor Taizong wrote a poem to his chancellor Xiao Yu that contains these two lines: Only in a gust of wind can the strong among the grass be known, Only in turmoil can the faithful subjects be seen. These lines differ slightly in ...


8

The quotation Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains is proverbial and dates to the late 19th century, more or less around Dickens's time. However, nothing like it is found in any of his novels or published letters. If he said it in an after-dinner speech, we have no records of the rest of the speech. Nor do we know when or to what audience he is ...


8

Searching for your quoted phrase online brings up a number of results all of which place the words inside inverted commas, suggesting they are all quoting something, as you surmised. Among the results is this New Zealand newspaper of 1898, which makes reference to the words being from an 'old song' rather than from a novel. There was a favourite old ...


7

The earliest instance that I can find via Google Book Search for this quotation is The Mourning After: How to Manage Grief Wisely (1993) by Stanley P. Cornils: Comparatively speaking, there are not many things in this world which are impossible. According to the older laws of aerodynamics, the bumblebee cannot fly because its fuselage is too big for its ...


6

TL;DR: Joseph Fort Newton. Looks like Joseph Fort Newton. I've looked through the discussion on Wikiquote, which is the basis for my research here. Dominique Pire, upon receiving the Nobel Prize, sourced it to 'Newton'. Just Newton. After that, it appears to be attributed to Isaac Newton, who is what most people think of when they hear 'Newton' (actually, ...


6

The great Turkish poet Orhan Veli Kanık wrote so neatly on the “great Turkish lies” more than half a century ago: “What have we not done for this country? Some of us have orated Some of us have died.” Source: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/opinion/burak-bekdil/why-fair-is-just-a-four-letter-word-in-turkish-87497


6

The first half of the quotation is from George Bernard Shaw, as reported by his biographer Hesketh Pearson. The second half is from Pearson himself. On the evening of October 10th [1946] my wife and I called to see him [Shaw]. Whitehall Court had been buzzing with reporters, two of whom had taken a flashlight photo of him, but the excitement Was now ...


5

Searching the Observer archives for 7th October 1979 shows that it wasn’t an interview, but just a quote in the quotations column: However, Google Search easily finds the original interview, "Paul Theroux, Restless Writer Of the Rails" by Paul Hendrickson, in the Washington Post, 20th September 1979: Now that he thinks about it—he has finished breakfast ...


5

In "Conversations with Jim Harrison", Harrison said (link): "I had to speak at Sam Lawrence's memorial service in New York and I was flipping through books again. Stephen Mitchell's translation of the Duino Elegies. At the end there are what show business calls "out takes", intended lines that Rilke didn't use. I said one at the memorial service: "...


5

It sounds very like lines 31–34 of Prometheus Bound: ἀνθ᾽ ὧν ἀτερπῆ τήνδε φρουρήσεις πέτραν ὀρθοστάδην, ἄυπνος, οὐ κάμπτων γόνυ: πολλοὺς δ᾽ ὀδυρμοὺς καὶ γόους ἀνωφελεῖς φθέγξῃ […] In the prose translation of Herbert Weir Smyth, that’s: Therefore on this joyless rock you must stand sentinel, erect, sleepless, your knee unbent. And many a groan ...


4

I finally managed to track down the answer to my question, after finding a reference to it in Kenneth Williams' diaries. The poem is by Stanley Baxter, whom Kenneth Williams knew in the second World War when they were both performing in the Combined Forces Entertainment unit. The poem is actually entitled 'Berlin in the Twenties', not the Thirties. As far as ...


4

This is not a Tennyson quote as far as we know. A member of the Tennyson Society have checked the Tennyson concordance, (not in itself complete), and confirms to me so far that this is not a Tennyson quote.


4

The earliest version of this story appears in A New Spirit of the Age by Richard H. Horne (1844), page 196: When somebody expressed his surprise to Shelley, that Keats, who was not very conversant with the Greek language, could write so finely and classically of their gods and goddesses, Shelley replied ‘He was a Greek.’ Horne gives no source for this ...


4

As far as I can see it's not a direct quote; I only found examples of indirect speech. In LOS POETAS Y SU VOZ - 3 Federico García Lorca, Gabriel Celaya, Gerardo Diego, the "quote" goes as follows: En esos momentos políticos alguien le preguntó sobre su preferencia política y él manifestó que se sentía a su vez católico, comunista, anarquista, libertario,...


4

This is conjectural, but just before the passage in question, Camus writes something like We sail across spaces so vast they seem unending. Sun and moon rise and fall in turn, on the same thread of light and night. Days at sea, as similar each to the other as happiness . . . which to me echos some (but not all) of this passage in R. L. Stevenson's In ...


4

Dirac’s The Principles of Quantum Mechanics (1930) ends with the paragraph: The present theory is very symmetrical between the electrons and protons. The symmetry is not mathematically perfect, as may easily be verified, when one takes interaction between the electrons into account. This cause, however, hardly appears to be sufficient, according to ...


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