14

In context, Mr. Darcy is replying to Miss Bingley, who has just accused Elizabeth Bennet of employing a “very mean art”: “Elizabeth Bennet,” said Miss Bingley, when the door was closed on her, “is one of those young ladies who seek to recommend themselves to the other sex by undervaluing their own; and with many men, I dare say, it succeeds. But, in my ...


11

Mr Darcy means that women sometimes use tactics to attract men. He says that such tactics show a certain cunning on the part of the women using them. He thinks that anything that uses cunning is worthy of contempt; cunning is thought of as sly and underhand. Meanness doesn't mean spite, as it does today. It means something small and unworthy. So Mr Darcy is ...


10

The scene you refer to takes place in chapter 56. In Chapter 57 we read: from what the report of their engagement could originate, Elizabeth was at a loss to imagine; till she recollected that his being the intimate friend of Bingley, and her being the sister of Jane, was enough, at a time when the expectation of one wedding made everybody eager for another,...


2

Elizabeth doesn't particularly like talking to Mr Collins about how great his marriage to Charlotte is. She is described in the previous paragraph as having to try "to unite civility and truth" -- this suggests that telling the truth about her feelings would not be polite. The particular sentence you have bolded says that she was glad his speech ...


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