36

TL;DR: The Longbourn estate is ‘entailed’ to male heirs only, whereas Rosings is not. Austen sets out the financial situation of the Bennets in detail: Mr. Bennet’s property consisted almost entirely in an estate of two thousand a year, which, unfortunately for his daughters, was entailed, in default of heirs male, on a distant relation; and their mother’s ...


16

First, we should note that Elizabeth is very specific here: she is only talking about her uncle and aunt, not of any other relatives. While it is perhaps natural that her thoughts should first go to those she was in company with, it is not so natural that they should not continue to her closer family. If it was a matter of shutting out all her family, then ...


14

In context, Mr. Darcy is replying to Miss Bingley, who has just accused Elizabeth Bennet of employing a “very mean art”: “Elizabeth Bennet,” said Miss Bingley, when the door was closed on her, “is one of those young ladies who seek to recommend themselves to the other sex by undervaluing their own; and with many men, I dare say, it succeeds. But, in my ...


11

JANE WAS RIGHT! The idea that Mr. Bennet could have barred the entail in Pride and Prejudice — thereby leaving Longbourn to his daughters — is surprisingly common. It is, however, wrong. Jane Austen understood the law of entail, and she described the Longbourn entail with great clarity. In my opinion as an attorney trained in trusts and estates law and ...


11

Mr Darcy means that women sometimes use tactics to attract men. He says that such tactics show a certain cunning on the part of the women using them. He thinks that anything that uses cunning is worthy of contempt; cunning is thought of as sly and underhand. Meanness doesn't mean spite, as it does today. It means something small and unworthy. So Mr Darcy is ...


10

The scene you refer to takes place in chapter 56. In Chapter 57 we read: from what the report of their engagement could originate, Elizabeth was at a loss to imagine; till she recollected that his being the intimate friend of Bingley, and her being the sister of Jane, was enough, at a time when the expectation of one wedding made everybody eager for another,...


8

Let's have a look at what Mr Bennet actually says to Mary in the passage alluded to in the question: [Elizabeth] looked at her father to entreat his interference, lest Mary should be singing all night. He took the hint, and when Mary had finished her second song, said aloud, ``That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long ...


5

It means that that Mr. Bingley was content with renting Netherfield and probably never would get around to buying a house of his own. In other words, he would leave the purchase of a house to the next generation, just like his father.


4

When Elizabeth expressed her gratitude for “your unexampled kindness to my poor sister”, Mr. Darcy correctly understood her as referring, not just to his attendance at the wedding of Lydia and Mr. Wickham, but to his financial contributions that persuaded the groom to go through with it. In my opinion, Mr. Darcy did not suspect Lydia of betraying his ...


3

'At York' as you have rightly remarked is far away from the scene of action. But York is figuratively used to mean a distant place; It metonymically describes any place far off, particular for the general. Lizzy doesn't care whosoever is around, she's oblivious of the surroundings and given to follow her own sweet will, all are removed from her reckoning to ...


3

Darcy’s discoveries are ‘mortifying’ (humbling, humiliating) because they are wounding to his pride. The appearance of ‘pride’ in the title of the novel alerts us to the significance of this aspect of his character. Darcy is a man who is especially proud of his social position, family connection, and self-sufficiency. At the Meryton assembly in chapter 3, ...


2

Elizabeth doesn't particularly like talking to Mr Collins about how great his marriage to Charlotte is. She is described in the previous paragraph as having to try "to unite civility and truth" -- this suggests that telling the truth about her feelings would not be polite. The particular sentence you have bolded says that she was glad his speech ...


2

It is not clear to me that this usage needs explanation. That is, using "Mr X" to refer to a rector in early 19th century England was not unusual, and was not disrespectful. In Anthony Trollope's 1858 novel Doctor Thorne the character Caleb Oriel is first mentioned in Then there were the Bakers, and the Batesons, and the Jacksons, who all lived near ...


2

The answer would appear to be, because we never see correspondence addressed to him. Mr Collins was a Rector, and while I cannot vouch for its currency at time of Austen’s writing, Debretts.com* gives several forms of address, for ranks of clergy including Rector and Vicar, dependent on the usage: Salutation: Dear Mr Denman, Dear Father Denman (for ...


1

a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached. Mary's "pedantic air and conceited manner" made her playing less appreciated, and it would have done so even if she had played better than she actually did. (It's unclear to me whether the "pedantic air and conceited manner" was in her playing ...


1

One of the many senses of "mortify" is (according to Wiktionary) (transitive, usually used passively) To embarrass, to humiliate. To injure one's dignity. [from 17th c.] and it is easy to find examples of forms of this word being used this way in 18th-20th century writing. James Boswell, in his Life of Johnson, for instance, has Soon after this ...


1

I consider the Elizabeth Bennett character "wooden" by modern standards. She is not as expressive as a modern heroine would be. But she speaks and acts in a manner appropriate for a lady of her time and station. Within that context, she was "lifelike" by the more restrained standards of her time. She exhibits a full range of feelings and emotions. ...


1

Lady Catherine's daughter would have got her maternal fortune owing to the fact that: she is a single child making her a lot more eligible to her mother's fortune, and Lady Catherine wanted her child to be married off to Mr Darcy, another aristocratic rank holder. She for sure, would not have left her child deprived of anything to rise the status to Mr ...


1

Mary stays home on behalf of watching her mother Mrs.Bennet, who could not sit alone. Mary is and always has been a bit of a recluse, with little social skills - she tends to studying and reading. She was obliged (encouraged) to mix more (interact) with the world, although to her parents surprise she was still able to moralize (pretentious/hypocritical ...


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