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TL;DR: FitzGerald made it up. Why? We don't know. As I expected, the translations of Rubaiyat are all over the place when it comes to sticking to the original text. First, I came across an analysis or FitzGerald's translation, which says the following: The sense here is presumably one of a disembodied Voice calling from the Great Unknown. But, this ...


9

It can depend on how you read the word "collected", and also how genuine you believe FitzGerald's version - with its omissions and insertions - to be. 11th century - 12th century The Rubaiyat had been popular in Persia since the 11th century. They were occasional verses, but there is nothing found to show they were brought together and published as a ...


7

I think there's actually a deeper meaning to this quotation. It touches upon the crucial link between identity and morality. In essence, Rumi is saying, how can I know what to do if I don't know who I am? In my opinion, the larger meaning depends on whether it is viewed as a rhetorical question or not. If it is viewed as rhetorical, then Rumi is implying ...


4

Here are some excerpts from Azar Nafisi's introduction to a new edition of the novel (published, and slightly edited, on The Guardian's website, 5/13/2006) that may indicate why it was banned by the Iranian government. In brief, it criticized the state of society and government in Iran at the time, and also talked about "love and eroticism" in a way that ...


4

Reeds (typha, or reedmace) and rushes (bulrush) are often confused, although they belong to different botanical families. In particular, typha (reedmace) is often misnamed as bulrush. Since both plants grow in water, you will often see them intermixed in streams and along riverbanks. So, a "rushy bed" is simply a bed of bulrushes (or typha). Note also that ...


3

First off, please be aware that Rumi's poetry is very often very poorly translated from the original Persian; the original meaning is often totally changed or lost in the English version. I found a couple of detailed articles about this online; it's very much worth the time to at least skim through these, check out their examples of Rumi poems with literal ...


3

The phrase "his textbook on medicine" in this question about Avicenna is a bit misleading, since Avicenna wrote more than one treatise on medicine: The Canon of Medicine / al-Qānūn fī al-Ṭibb, which is in prose; The Book of Healing / Kitāb al-Šifāʾ, which is in verse; an adaptation (in the same metre as The Book of Healing) of a set of Aphorisms attributed ...


2

This is a translation of the tenth couplet of this poem from the Diwan-e Shams-e Tabrizi: تو جان جان جهانی و نام تو عشق است     هر آنک از تو پری یافت بر علو گردد And it translates something like this: You are the Soul of the Soul of the Universe. And your name is Love Whoever found a feather of you has come to a high position Note that this ...


2

TL;DR: This is a bad translation of a line from ghazal 332 in the Diwan-e Shams-e Tabrizi. A more accurate translation would be, “the house of love has no limits”. This was hard to track down, because the original poem has neither “garden of the world” nor “except in your mind”, leaving us with only “has no limits” to go on! I hope to convince you that this ...


1

The "jewel of the secret treasury" strikes me as the heart, and the "seal" and "key" refer to the heart being preserved for the lover and loved, while the "pearls" refer to the loving glances between. Hearts are often referred to as jewels in poetry, and we also read of the "seal" being upon the "treasure casket"; as the heart is a "jewel", this implies it ...


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