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13

The passions survive the hand that mocked [the passions] and the heart that fed [the passions]. That means that the passions (by being impressed on the lifeless statue) outlived both the sculptor's hand and the pharaoh's heart. I don't know if this definition of survive is confusing you, or if it's just the convoluted syntax in general. From Oxford ...


8

Probably not. Ozymandias is the Greek version of Ramesses the Great's throne name. Writing about a statue of him, the Greek writer Diodorus Siculus wrote of a large statue with the inscription King of Kings Ozymandias am I. If any want to know how great I am and where I lie, let him outdo me in my work. Here already "King of Kings" is used in the ...


6

Probably Not First of all, it's inaccurate to say that "the Church used to [w]ield more power than any king in Europe." The Church certainly used to wield more temporal power than it does now, and was more widely regarded as a moral authority that regular kings should submit to. But relations between the Papacy and various European monarchs were varied and ...


6

Essentially, Yes. The other stories were abandoned. On that famous night, there were four people trying their hands at ghost stories: Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, his wife to be Mary Godwin and John Polidori who was not known as a writer but was serving as Byron's physician. We won't go over the genesis of Mary's tale, Frankenstein, as this is well known. ...


4

The earliest version of this story appears in A New Spirit of the Age by Richard H. Horne (1844), page 196: When somebody expressed his surprise to Shelley, that Keats, who was not very conversant with the Greek language, could write so finely and classically of their gods and goddesses, Shelley replied ‘He was a Greek.’ Horne gives no source for this ...


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