15 votes
Accepted

Source of quote: "Speaking the truth that somebody wants you not to publish is journalism. Everything else is marketing."

This quote has a long history and its true origins are obscure. I began my investigation of this question by doing a web search for quote speaking truth wants publish journalism marketing. In the ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 72.3k
11 votes
Accepted

In "The Importance of Being Earnest", what does 'Or they come in the evening, at any rate' mean?

It is a reference to the English class system. Lady Bracknell, a stickler for propriety, is suggesting that the Liberals are lower class than herself. The lower classes don't dine in the evening, ...
Chenmunka's user avatar
  • 2,307
7 votes

What do these lines mean in 'The Importance of Being Earnest'?

The key part of this passage is that just prior to attempting to hug Miss Prism, Jack had confirmed that the handbag he was left in as a child belonged to her. Therefore he believes she is his mother. ...
Alan T.'s user avatar
  • 350
7 votes

How to know if "The Importance of Being Earnest" is farce or satire or both?

Satire, parody, and farce can be hard to cleanly separate because so many works use two or all three of these devices. In their most specific senses the meanings given by the OED are as follows: a ...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
  • 55.1k
5 votes

How does "The Importance of Being Earnest" challenge the treatment of women in sterotypical Victorian society?

I don't think these comments are anything to do with the treatment of women in general; they are just humorous references to the conventions of Victorian formal dinners. Sara Paston-Williams in The ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
4 votes

What does "even so did I" mean?

This is an archaic style of English, presumably used by Wilde in an attempt to give the poem a "biblical" feel, mimicking the style of English seen in translations of the Bible such as the ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 72.3k
3 votes
Accepted

Does “The Picture of Dorian Gray” contain any explicit content?

Sex between two men is implied, but not outright stated From the book (Basil to Dorian): "There was that wretched boy in the Guards who committed suicide. You were his great friend. There was ...
Sean Duggan's user avatar
  • 10.4k
3 votes

Understanding the last lines from Oscar Wilde’s The Model Millionaire

The question is wrong about who makes that speech at the end. It is not the Baron, but the best man at Hughie's wedding to his fiancée Laura: When they were married Alan Trevor was the best-man, and ...
verbose's user avatar
  • 25.4k
3 votes
Accepted

What do these lines say about Victorian investments and taxes?

The context of this line is Lady Bracknell's interrogation of Jack, as she tries to discover whether he would be a good match for her daughter. She asks him a number of questions, and most of his ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 72.3k
3 votes

Meaning of Lady Bracknell's phrasing in The Importance of Being Ernest

Lady Bracknell is indeed suggesting that Cecily get a makeover, though not necessarily by the same French maid as Lady Lancing, just a French maid. By "her own husband did not know her", Lady ...
Alan T.'s user avatar
  • 350
2 votes

What is the humour behind these lines in 'The Importance Of Being Earnest'?

Algernon is looking for an excuse to leave before Jack gets back. Rather than saying he has to be present at a business appointment, Algernon says that he has to miss the appointment. The humor is ...
b a's user avatar
  • 320
2 votes

Is Cecily being sarcastic about the fact that Dr Chasuble is not learned?

She's not mocking Chasuble: it's clear that he has the skills required of a clergyman. Rather it is a joke based on the idea that people who write books know nothing. From that, it follows that not ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 729
2 votes

Can someone explain what "corrupt without being charming" means?

I would say it refers to the idea of a slick, snake oil-y salesman: corrupt, but corrupt by charming you out of your money. They sort of find the beauty in the ugly things; smooth it all over until it ...
auden's user avatar
  • 4,742
1 vote

Who's the woman at the opium den?

This is one of those plot devices with no explanation. They're usually not plot-critical, and the author can use them to develop follow-up plots (sequels) in the future. It's hinted that the woman is ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 533
1 vote

Can someone explain what "corrupt without being charming" means?

I think this passage is fairly straight-forward in the context of the novel. Many of the characters are corrup (that is, enjoy pastimes and activities that the society of that time thought morally ...
Paula's user avatar
  • 362
1 vote
Accepted

'worth so many beeves' proverb

The proverb as representative, in historical criticism — that is, critical analysis of a text based on its historical, cultural and social context — of a ...
JEL's user avatar
  • 161

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible