7

It's not an apostrophe but an opening quotation mark, paired with a closing quotation mark at the end of the stanza. If I am understanding rightly, this stanza is spoken by a monk into whose monastery the Giaour has come, and he is describing the Giaour's behaviour. (Hence e.g. his invocation of St Francis later in the stanza.) In at least one early edition ...


5

I don't know about this specific book, but they could simply be actual place names. For instance: Cross Roads, Pennsylvania. And an 1861 NYT news article reports that "The skirmish took place about one mile in advance of the Cross Roads, just this side of the railroad", referring to a place properly known as "Ball's Cross Roads". ...


2

‘To Autumn’ was first published in Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of St Agnes and Other Poems (London: Taylor and Hessey, 1820) where it starts on page 137 and you can see for yourself that the first stanza of the poem ends with a full stop. The book was published in July 1820, a couple of months before Keats departed for Italy, so it seems likely that he had the ...


2

The difference is based in grammar. The capitalised terms fall into two groups. There are the straightforward nouns, 'Rock' and 'River' etc preceded by an indefinite article, 'A' and which can be taken as single examples of their class, but there are also Definite Generics where the singular noun represents the whole class or category, you can have 'A Rock' ...


2

I speak no German and have no knowledge of the play beyond what quarter of an hour on Google has rendered. From that it is clear that the characters whose speech is broken up with obliques are dead people, skeletons or incarnations of death itself. It would seem then that the slash marks are to indicate a difference in the manner of the speech from the ...


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