20

On the answer Much of the structure of this answer is based on the very clear history of The Odyssey and The Iliad written by Nicolas Bertrand in a 2009 Article (PDF). The primary sources discussed are the following, and I will try to reference them more closely in successive edits, but this is a process that takes time, as I relied on translations to write ...


15

Colleen is the Anglicised version of the Irish Gaelic cailín, meaning young woman or maid. Derivation: caile (“maid”) +‎ -ín (diminutive suffix) Although girls are sometimes named Colleen, in the context of the lyric it shouldn't have a capital C. The New English-Irish dictionary has other usages.


9

Quite conveniently, Neil Gaiman answered this in his interview with Hy Bender for The Sandman Companion. In chapter 4, which is devoted to Doll's House, Hy asks Neil whether he was inspired by anything in particular for this story: HB: The first story proper, "Tales in the Sand", reads like a true African fairy tale. Given its authentic feel, I ...


5

While I appreciate the attention drawn to my academic article and my translations of Alevi hymns, I should like to make some remarks on the question and perhaps provide some answers. First of all, the source noted does not contain "a hymn" but an entire liturgy with multiple texts. Let us not diminish the achievement, such as it is, of putting a whole ...


3

The hymn would appear to have references to Alevism; Alevis are the second largest belief community in Turkey. However language, belief and ethnic background is not registered in the national census therefore, it is not possible to have official statistics about the number of Alevis. On the basis of reliable academic research, the population of Alevis is ...


3

Most likely it was the poet himself: Dandilion is not just a simple troubadour wandering through the countries following Geralt, he graduated with honours the Oxenfurt University, then he has spent year teaching to other students (and occasionally he returns there as a guest lecturer). This suggests that he is indeed a famous poet, well known in the world. ...


3

The oldest surviving Robin Hood tales are A Gest of Robyn Hode, between 1492 and 1534, Robin Hood and the Monk written after 1450, and Robin Hood and the Potter, about 1503. There is no evidence that the tales were written down prior to that. Although the first literary reference to Robin Hood was in 1370-ish (in Piers Plowman), it does not require the ...


3

From what I can find, they existed in written form from quite early in the 13th century, and it wasn't until the 19th century that the veracity of the event was challenged. From the wiki on Sangerkreig: The oldest poetic accounts, dating from the 13th century, describe specific episodes of the contest such as the Fürstenlob and the Rätselspiel. The ...


2

From the Wikipedia entry for Colleen: Colleen is a common English language name of Irish-American origin and a generic term for Irish women or girls, from the Irish cailín 'unmarried girl/woman', the diminutive of caile 'woman, countrywoman'. (My emphasis)


2

According to "The Real Robin Hood" on History.com, the first literary references to Robin Hood appear in a series of 14th- and 15th-century ballads about a violent yeoman who lived in Sherwood Forest with his men and frequently clashed with the Sheriff of Nottingham. Rather than a peasant, knight or fallen noble, as in later versions, the ...


1

"Whiskey in the Jar" (see Wikipedia and LiveAbout) is a traditional Irish folk song about a man who robs an army officer and then is betrayed by his lover. Originally an oral tradition with many variations, it has been recorded by various bands and singers in the 20th century. The origin of this song would have been during the time of British rule ...


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