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14

The story is called The Discounters of Money. It occurs in the collection of O. Henry stories called Roads of Destiny. It occupies pages 379 to 384 in this book. …and there you have young Howard Pilkins with 4,000,000; and a good fellow at that. He was an agreeable, modestly arrogant young man, who implicitly believed that money could buy anything that ...


7

The Defeat of the City It's the protagonist who issues the challenge, but the other details seem to match: That night when the greetings and the supper were over, the entire family, including Buff, the yellow dog, bestrewed itself upon the front porch. Alicia, not haughty but silent, sat in the shadow dressed in an exquisite pale-gray tea gown. ... Robert ...


6

O. Henry is considered a master of the short story, and this excerpt tells you why. His very first paragraph tells you something about a main character and about the conflict. Parsimony, or penny pinching, is generally considered an undesirable trait (or was in Henry's time). A young married woman such as Della would be responsible for shopping and cooking, ...


4

In the story it is clear from the starting line that Del and Jim were poverty-stricken. Such was the extent of poverty that even the cents were in pennies. Henry mentions the pennies were saved cautiously by (Della) almost pressurizing the grocer, the vegetable man or the butcher. She literally overpowered them (metaphorically bulldozed) and saved pennies ...


4

While both of the existing answers touch on relevant matters I believe they both miss the mark in terms of the intended meaning. @frathoss cites a range of definitions including one which supports the OED definition of 'rubber' as North American colloquial. To listen (in) on a party telephone line, or on any telephone conversation. but declares the ...


4

The entire phrase is a nonsensical piece of wordplay "The lame walk and the blind see" is a well known biblical phrase, said by Jesus to indicate his holiness. The phrase is corrupted here into nonsense, in keeping with the nonsense religious position he claims immediately before it, and the nonsense powers he claims after it. "The lame talk" makes no ...


3

The title Gift of the Magi, is a biblical allusion from Matthew 2:1 reading: “Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem” (KJV). The Greek word for ‘wise men’ is Μάγοι (magoi) (plural form of μάγος (magos)) meaning a Magian, i.e. Oriental scientist; by implication, a ...


3

The paragraph in which the quote from the question can be found goes as follows: "Him?" said Nancy, with her coolest, sweetest, most impersonal, Van Alstyne Fisher smile; "not for mine. I saw him drive up outside. A 12 H. P. machine and an Irish chauffeur! And you saw what kind of handkerchiefs he bought--silk! And he's got dactylis on him. Give me the ...


2

This solves the crux of the problem. Here, Ben Price is confident that Jimmy Valentine could, in a way, dodge the judiciary; he was to serve full term in jail. To show him clemency is just another name of foolishness; now, that mistake must not be repeated. During O. Henry's time (around 1900) 'bit' has the currency to mean legal punishment. In the use of ...


1

You might be actually thinking about Faulkner's 'The Reivers', which begins with "Grandfather said:", and the rest of the book is one long quotation.


1

That refers to the "answer" alluded to in the previous sentence. When you have a million dollars, you don't appreciate the things you already have. In the case of their gifts, it really is the thought that counts, because they've rendered each other's gifts useless. Them refers to the titular gifts, specifically, gold, frankincense, and myrrh. Henry may be ...


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