7

Even the Party has to make some concessions to reality. Sure, they can work on Winston until Anything could be true. The so-called laws of Nature were nonsense. The law of gravity was nonsense. 'If I wished,' O'Brien had said, 'I could float off this floor like a soap bubble.' Winston worked it out. 'If he thinks he floats off the floor, and if I ...


6

He does not literally die at the end of the novel. The concluding paragraphs make it clear that his death is metaphorical. Winston is in the Chestnut Tree Café, listening to the news of the victory over Eurasia: Ah, it was more than a Eurasian army that had perished! Much had changed in him since that first day in the Ministry of Love, but the final, ...


6

While edition 1 is not imperfect, edition 2 is more perfect than edition 1. Repeat as each new, more perfect, edition is released. After all, "perfect" is not necessarily an absolute quality in Newspeak. (As exemplified in the latest, doubleplusperfect, edition of the dictionary.)


4

In terms of explicit imagery, Orwell is referring to the yellow sunlight passing between the trees and making bright patterns on the ground, thusly. These similes and metaphors reflect a fairly simple 'pathetic fallacy', where Winston's mental state change and improvement (in terms of his journey from the grim city into the beautiful countryside where he ...


3

In The Collected Essays, Journalism, and Letters of George Orwell, he expresses this view many times. (After the war, he reflected on how he tended to overestimate forces pushing toward socialism and underestimate on those pushing away.) The problem with identifying exactly when he said the concept first is that you have to decide exactly how close the idea ...


2

Reverence is a deep respect shown to someone or something. Usually, when you revere something, you know why you do so, and it is colored by that knowledge. One reveres a mountain for its majesty, or a perfect rose for its beauty. In this case, Smith does not really understand why it is singing, but he knows it's not for a specific audience. This is ...


2

O'Brien is the party, he is the one who creates the reality for others. He is a member of the "Inner Party" and the one who creates the illusion; O'Brien is the one in charge of everything and controlling society, and he is the one that labels thought criminals so.


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