15

Yeah, you've basically got it. They're syllabic stress indicators. Comics are pretty text-light for how information-dense they need to be. So, tricks like this are used to highlight tonal shifts where they might not otherwise be immediately obvious. There's even a TVTropes page about this. Especially when trying to convey emphasis, even in such a high ...


15

The theory proposed by Terry Pratchett is that "Best of Queen" is the only decent music that can be found on the road in gas station markets, so those CDs tend to accumulate in the car, without the driver noticing them much. Neil Gaiman proposes that the CDs do really turn into "Best of Queen" albums, just like that. He occasionally gets fan mail about it: ...


14

Often with a Pratchett joke, if I don't 'get it', it is worth asking myself what Pratchett knew that I didn't, and the text often gives me a clue where to start looking. And the same applies here, though I don't know which text is Pratchett and which Gaiman. Fourteenth-century minds, the lot of them. Spending years picking away at one soul. Admittedly it ...


14

In Norse mythology, he is called both Fenrir and Fenrisúlfr. Fenrisúlfr means Fenrir's Wolf, but it seems to be common to translate it as Fenris Wolf. For example, here's a poem (from Vafþrúðnismál, I believe) that calls him "Fenrir": Óðinn kvað: "Fjölð ek fór, fjölð ek freistaðak, fjölð ek of reynda regin: Hvaðan kemr sól á inn slétta himin, er ...


12

Sergeant Shadwell is looking for one of the traditional signs of witchcraft. That is, the answer to the question, “Is there actually a traditional connection between witchcraft and nipples” is yes. Specifically, it was believed that a witch would often have a familiar: a demon in the shape of an animal, or an animal bound to their will through magic, or ...


11

Because he doesn't. Or maybe he does, just a little bit, because Gaiman sort of looks like a whole bunch of other dudes (and dudettes) who influenced Morpheus' looks. Well, at least his face hasn't been explicitly stated to be based on Gaiman's. Reading through canon (that is, word of gods - people who actually worked on The Sandman) sources, I couldn't ...


10

The author describes the novel as having a sort of external third-person viewpoint ... I found an interview with Neil Gaiman in which he says that Shadow isn't like most point-of-view characters: we don't get inside his head much, but rather experience events together with him. I actually wrote the entire first chapter in the first person. That was my ...


9

It was a decision by the letterer, Todd Klein. As he explains in The Sandman Companion, it was supposed to reflect her fluent, shifting nature: Delirium was a different challenge. "Her lettering constantly changes in size, shape, and slant, wobbling in out, to indicate that she's always on the verge of madness," Klein says. "Her balloons also contain a ...


9

Quite conveniently, Neil Gaiman answered this in his interview with Hy Bender for The Sandman Companion. In chapter 4, which is devoted to Doll's House, Hy asks Neil whether he was inspired by anything in particular for this story: HB: The first story proper, "Tales in the Sand", reads like a true African fairy tale. Given its authentic feel, I was ...


9

There is no indication in various sources found online that Gaiman was influenced by Heinrich Heine. In short, these are the authors Gaiman said he was influenced by: Michail Bulgakov, Master and Margarita I loved it when I read it, yes;1 Mary Shelley He wrote an essay titled Mary Shelley: My Hero J. R. R. Tolkien (duh) I came to the conclusion ...


9

While we can't rule out an influence from Lewis, he was not Gaiman's primary motivation. Gaiman has named different influences for Stardust. Stardust has a much closer parallel to the 1926 book Lud-In-The-Mist by Hope Mirrlees. Gaiman has praised the book, including it in a list of his all-time favourite novels. In this newspaper feature, he makes clear ...


8

It looks like he was influenced by traditional English fairy stories and in particular a writer by the name of Lucy Clifford A star still falls, a boy still promises to bring it to his true love, there are still wicked witches and ghosts and lords (although the lords have now become princes.) They even gave the story an unabashedly happy ending, which is ...


8

I have not been able to source a quote from the author, but there is an interview which offers some circumstantial evidence that Crowley is indeed named after the famous Occultist. Actor Mark Sheppard played a character called Crowley in the TV series Supernatural. There is a common presumption among fans of that show that the character was inspired by ...


7

I will start with question 3, as it is the most straightforward. Gaiman has done a whole lot of elaboration on a passage that is in fact rather short. I will quote the relevant passages from the primary sources, as they are rather short. First Völuspá: To three there came from the land this high and mighty Aesir to the house, found they ...


7

You have seen that the viewers' perception of Endless is based on individual expectations. For instance, Dream appears as a black short-haired man to Nada, while he usually looks like a pale white messy haired man (not like Neil Gaiman at all) But that's not all. The Endless are different from all the other entities in the sense they are truly endless. ...


7

The first "Greatest Hits of Queen" album that is featured in the book is the most sold album in british pop history. Everyone in UK has the cd lying around somewhere, so chances are high that when you look for a cd in the car you get the impression that you always find the "Greatest Hits of Queen".


7

Pratchett also has a running joke throughout his books about items of entertainment morphing into more stereotypical/low brow forms when the owners aren't looking. Compare this quote from The Last Continent: It is a simple universal law. People always expect to use a holiday in the sun as an opportunity to read those books they’ve always meant to read, ...


6

The three women is a recurring motif in stories and mythology. The fates, the graces, the furies in Greek mythology, the norns in Norse mythology, Shakespeare's weird sisters, etc. In The Sandman, Gaiman recurrently hints that the three-in-one are both the fates and the furies. Perhaps the three - the mother, the maiden, the crone, also stands for some ...


6

It seems it is because many people believe that Dream is Neil's alter ego, probably because at least in some panels Morpheus DOES look like Gaiman: Empire's "50 greatest comic characters" states that Over the run, Dream's appearance has been based on David Bowie, Bauhaus' Peter Murphy, The Cure's Robert Smith and author Neil Gaiman. Gaiman himself ...


6

Her Wikia page says this about the colors of the speech bubbles: Todd Klein, the series' letterer, draws her speech as a scrawl, against a multi-colored background, sometimes the background color will match the mood she is in (red for anger, blue and green for calm, etc.). They don't, as far as I can tell, have a citation for this claim. It appears to be ...


6

Cain is most probably right in blaming Abel for "sanitising". When was "that time"? When The Dreaming was first established, Dream was its only inhabitant for millions of years - at least according to Neil Gaiman: I always assumed the Sandman spent millions of years in a version of The Dreaming completely on his own; and I think he quite enjoys the ...


6

Warning: answer contains MASSIVE unmarked spoilers! Lack of surprise fits with the process he's going through. After Shadow dies on the tree, his entire experience in the succeeding chapters is a surreal journey of enlightenment and oblivion. He forgets real-world things like his name, and learns so much more (which he soon forgets after coming back to ...


6

Take my word for it or not, but I'm the writer of the article "Mytho-Auto-Bio: Neil Gaiman's Sandman, the Romantics, and Shakespeare's The Tempest." The study focuses the reasons why Gaiman intended to finish Sandman with "The Tempest" by representing Shakespeare completing his bargain with Morpheus in writing The Tempest, which is supposedly Shakespeare's ...


6

I disagree with your second paragraph - she plays quite an important role in Lakeside, when she defends Shadow from Audrey, and doesn't give him away to police (despite having multiple reasons to report him). I believe it was important for Shadow to see that there are people who trust him and believe him, and in him, which is important at the end of the ...


5

The Three Witches appear multiple times in the Sandman series, often showing a penchant for trickery and subtle jokes. Here, they are giving Dream a hard time about their names, comparing several Triple Goddesses and throwing in some pop culture references for fun. This implies that they consider themselves to embody aspects of the Triple Goddess, across ...


5

The Dreaming is supposed to be a reflection of the real world... or maybe vice versa? In any case, The Dreaming (and Dream), in a sense, define the real world - by defining the things that are not real. Click for full resolution According to Destiny, Morpheus' realm is a "metaphor" or an "allusion" of the real world; it's then easy to interpret dreams ...


5

I think it's important to remember in this case that The Sandman was originally published in monthly issues; they were connected by overarching stories, but weren't collected in volumes. Thus I replace the question "Does part four of Doll's House add to the narrative of the volume?" with the question "Why was the story 'Men of Good Fortune' collected in The ...


5

I think @Shokhet is probably correct in that it's likely a form of teasing/light antagonism, but, on further reflection, it probably goes deeper than that. It is an older, less known name for Ishtar. Names have power, and Morpheus is showing some by reminding her he knows her entire history. (The Endless are older than the gods, and likely more powerful.)...


5

I'd say that yes, this is a subtle dig at American culture in the way that you described. A fair proportion of the UK population see the American 'ruling elite' as only having their own interests at heart. Raising the anti-christ in this environment would give the child a good grounding for the tasks ahead of him/her. I'd also suggest that it was a ...


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