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When a story is told from a single character's point of view, this type of narrative is known as third-person-limited narration (see Terms Used by Narratology and Film Theory by Dino Franco Felluga, Pudue University). This type of narration can be contrasted with other third-person narratives, such as the omniscient third-person narration and the objective ...


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The boundaries of expectation set by a story's narration fall under the general heading of point of view. In itself, point of view is a simple concept: what is the relationship of the narrator to the narrative? Or more simply still, who's telling the story, and when? This simplicity itself reveals the foundational nature of point of view to the unfolding of ...


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The technique where an author gives us direct access to what a character is thinking is called interior monologue. The passage you quote above tells us what the governess is saying in her own mind: "I wish it wasn't night time. I wish there was another woman in the carriage. I'm frightened of the men next door." Notice that this is set off from ...


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A memoir does not need to have a consistent reliable narrator. First off, what is a memoir, and how does it differ from a historical novel and how does it differ from a textbook? Dictionary.com defines the word thusly: a record of events written by a person having intimate knowledge of them and based on personal observation. Usually memoirs. a. ...


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The point of view in ‘A Worn Path’ can be described as “third-person, limited, objective”. That is, it is told from the point of view of a “third person”, a narrator who not themselves a character in the story; it is “limited” (as opposed to “omniscient”), describing only things seen and experienced by the protagonist; and it is “objective” (as opposed to “...


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