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9

We can trace out some possible answers to this by examining the history of her life. Her father encouraged her interest in the classics from an early age. "My father was well-to-do, but he wasn't interested in making money; he was interested in making people use their minds"; thus, her father guided her towards the Classics, and, when she was ...


8

This is not meant to be definitive nor exhaustive, but merely an exploration of certain themes and symbols in the poem: Yeats is widely regarded as one of the great poets of the ages--Eliot considered him the greatest poet of the 20th century--and is certainly of similar stature with the greatest poets of antiquity. Thus his innovations regarding subjects ...


8

There are great variations of how trolls are portrayed, but it is not primarily a matter of national literature. I will be focusing on Sweden and Norway, where I know the traditions best. First, we should note that trolls range in appearance from some that are quite human-like, to the point that they are able to move in human society and can only be spotted ...


7

I will start with question 3, as it is the most straightforward. Gaiman has done a whole lot of elaboration on a passage that is in fact rather short. I will quote the relevant passages from the primary sources, as they are rather short. First Völuspá: To three there came from the land this high and mighty Aesir to the house, found they ...


7

First, I'd like to note that my knowledge on English verse is not as good as of Norse. Thus I will start with a description of Norse verse, and then try to compare with what I know of English verse. Norse verse Since Tolkien is obviously talking about the verse found in eddic poetry (as opposed to the kind of scaldic poetry that where aimed at Kings and ...


6

Summary The post says, “The original account … uses it to illustrate Cnut’s humility.” But note that Henry of Huntingdon only wrote that Cnut was humble afterwards, not that he intended this beforehand. His version did not explain the king’s motive at all, leaving a gap that later historians filled. Cnut’s motive seems to have been introduced into the story ...


5

I think @Shokhet is probably correct in that it's likely a form of teasing/light antagonism, but, on further reflection, it probably goes deeper than that. It is an older, less known name for Ishtar. Names have power, and Morpheus is showing some by reminding her he knows her entire history. (The Endless are older than the gods, and likely more powerful.)...


5

Collectively, the stories are called the Epic Cycle. They tell the whole story of the Trojan War, from the Judgment of Paris to the death of Odysseus. It includes the Iliad and the Odyssey (though the term "Epic Cycle" is often used just to refer to non-Homeric books). Like those two, the Epic Cycle is based on older, oral stories, possibly dating back as ...


5

No. In fact, each poem has a closer relative within the corpus of Keats's work. There's also a stronger connection between "Endymion" and one of Shelley's poems that there is between the former and "Hyperion". Keats first used the Endymion myth in an 1816 poem, "I stood tip-toe upon a little hill". This poem uses the union of Cynthia and Endymion to ...


4

I believe Shippey meant that this may have been Tolkien's goal at the beginning, but like Tolkien's other "solutions" he seems to have abandoned it as the story grew in the telling. Tolkien's conceit of the Silmarillion as a mythology for England was largely abandoned through the constant rewrites. In fact, Tolkien abandoned it even more thoroughly than the ...


4

The primary sources Let us start with what the sources actually say they were given, and by whom. First, from Völuspá: Mind they not own, reflection they had not, no vision nor cover or colour fine; mind gave Odinn, reflection gave Hænir, vision gave Lódurr and colour fine. Then, Snorri, in Gylfaginning, chapter IX: When the sons of Borr were ...


4

In Greek mythology, Zephyr (or Zephyrus or Zephros) was the personification of the west wind. The west wind was the bringer of spring and early summer. He also served Cupid (because he fell in love with Hyacinth, etc). Because of this, in European tradition, the west wind has always been considered favorable and mild. On the other hand, in poems like Percy ...


2

You're overthinking it. As the 'great mother goddess', Ishtar is literally the 'many-named', the 'thousand-named', the 'myriad-named' and—while you can guess at why the character Morpheus goaded her into suicide by calling her by her lesser names—the author Gaiman is just taking the occasion to point out her other names and former importance, amid her ...


2

The reason for her insistence on the name Ishtar could be quite simple. Belili is the name applied by the Canaanites (1) who were Hebrew, and had their own God. Astarte is the Hellenised form (2), as in Greek. They too had their own Gods. Ishtar is the original Mesopotamian version (3,4) and was associated with far more than just sex. This could suggest ...


2

The Wikipedia contributors did a fairly decent job of gathering what little information is available about Gugalanna. The only text in the Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature (ETCSL) that mentions Gugalanna/Gud-gal-ana is Inana's descent to the nether world, a poem in which the goddess Inanna decides to visit the Netherworld. When Neti, the chief ...


2

How about the oldest known work of literature, The Epic of Gilgamesh (c. 2100 BC)? The legendary character of Enkidu is a "wild man", living with the beasts until he is seduced and tamed by a prostitute to the ways of civilisation. He's not exactly a normal human even physically, since he was created out of clay by the gods to defeat Gilgamesh, but ...


1

This comes under the heading of history or social sciences, rather than literature. But: Herodotus (c. 484 BC – c. 425 BC) relates, in his Histories (Book II), the story of Psammeticus (Psamtik I), who ruled Egypt from 664–610 BC causing two children to be brought up with minimal contact with humans: Taking two newborn children belonging to persons of ...


1

I'm going to attempt an answer, based on my knowledge of mythology in general, and Classical mythology in particular, with the caveat that I'd redirect you towards Stack Mythology where the real Norse experts reside. The separation of qualities among different deities is a staple of most pantheons. Even in fairly binary pantheons such as Zoroastrianism you'...


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