6

This question may be too broad ... there are a lot of illustrated "solve the mystery" books for kids, and neither planes nor mansions are particularly uncommon settings. However, one very possible answer is the first three stories in the Usborne Puzzle Adventure series, published in the late 1980s. I owned a single-volume copy of all three of these stories, ...


5

TL;DR: The criminal butler was not a cliché of detective stories, but of silent films! Below I’ve listed ten silent films with criminal butlers, and another six where an apparently guilty butler is a significant suspect. I found these by searching the AFI catalog and IMDb for mysteries with “butler” in the synopsis. Silent films with criminal butlers Year ...


4

The Mad Scientists' Club series by Bertrand R. Brinley The Mad Scientists' Club: A strange sea monster suddenly appears on Strawberry Lake, a fortune is unearthed from an old cannon and a valuable dinosaur egg is stolen. Who's responsible? Those seven junior geniuses -- and their wild ideas. Watch out as the Mad Scientists' Club turns the town of ...


3

Thanks to a friend, I found my book! It's the series of The Bodin sisters, Blanche and Berthe Bodin, written by Jean-Pierre Ferrière from 1957 to 1961. I don't think it has been translated to English, though, and, after skimming through the first tome, I think it qualifies more as "roman de gare" than "polar". Two 70 years old women start ...


3

This seems like the one. Except it doesn’t seem to be a pseudonym, as there is a biography and photo of the author available. The ‘Allmen’ crime series by Swiss author Martin Suter focuses on the adventures of Johann Friedrich von Allmen. Written in German, with a couple available in English translation. German titles and author photo can be seen at Amazon....


2

"Puzzle for Poppy" by Patrick Quentin Looking up "Yours Truly, Jack the Ripper" led me to the ISFDB page, which listed two Hitchcock anthologies that included the story, Alfred Hitchcock's Fireside Book of Suspense and Alfred Hitchcock's Spellbinders in Suspense, the latter of which looked very familiar, but none of the listed entries ...


2

Interesting question. Regarding your observation about the greater prevalence of concerns with homophobia in detective fiction vs other fiction genres, that seems like a bit of a stretch conclusion...maybe even premature. In other words, more cross-genre evidence is required in support of the claim. What's worth noting (as you've done) is that there has ...


2

Crash & Burn (2015), third book of the Tessa Leoni series by Lisa Gardner. From Goodreads: My name is Nicky Frank. Except, most likely, it isn’t. Nicole Frank shouldn’t have been able to survive the car accident, much less crawl up the steep ravine. Not in the dark, not in the rain, not with her injuries. But one thought allows her to defy the odds and ...


1

It could be Simon Brett's Feathering series. What matches: Two retired ladies solving mysteries. Jude is extroverted, Carole is much calmer. stumble on their first case by accident. series started in the year 2000. I'm not sure if that counts as "way older" than 2010. I've only read one of them, and that years ago. I don't know about losing the ...


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