7

Having read both the original version and a Latvian translation, I would say that the original tries to to say that the Caribbean does not exist in relation to Archibald Archibaldovich. Ie. It is a different way of saying that he isn't and never has been a pirate, to whom he is compared and the restaurant is not a pirate ship in Carribean. The idea of ...


6

Canonical interpretation is that it was a vision of Tiberius - roman emperor of that time. One of the reliable sources for this is the Gasparov's text of about the structure of the novel, but no one argues with this interpretation. And, as usual for Bulgakov, it also could be the reference to some real person from Bulgakov's time. Gasparov (and others) ...


4

It was indeed a very thinly veiled order: 'I am very glad to hear it. Now for the second question. It concerns that man . . . what's his name? . . . Judas of Karioth.' At this the visitor again gave the Procurator his open-eyed glance, then, as was fitting, hooded his eyes again. 'They say,' the Procurator went on, lowering his voice, ' that ...


4

There is no definite answer here, only interpretations are possible here. My thoughts: your translation is really terrible. In Russian text there no "romantics", they are "mystics". This "black-eyed man" is definitely Archibald and some mystics even tell a story that once upon a time he was a pirate. "But that, of course, is pure fantasy" - this is even ...


1

There's no canon information. There exist several random guesses, listed on Russian Wikipedia; none of which has any meaningful proof either textually or authorial-intent wise (although most guesses there pertain to either prototypes or the Korovyev name, not "Fagot" - and those seem equally baseless). To me personally, "Bassoon" as far ...


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