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As this article explains, The basic manoeuvre is a sucking of air through the teeth from behind pursed lips – or as academics describe it, a "velaric ingressive airstream involving closure at two points in the mouth". But thereafter there is nuance. There is the short, sharp kiss from the front teeth on either side. Usually this denotes minor ...


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I found an explanation of "kissing teeth" in a blog post by Azizi Powell on Pancocojams, a blog which (in its own words) showcases the customs of people of Black descent throughout the world. In this post, she explains something about the history of the term and the various different words which can be used for it in different parts of the ...


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Strictly speaking, the choice of the child's name is not Tan-Tan's decision but the author's. The book's setting is a Caribbean-colonised planet (Toussaint) and another planet, New Half-Way Tree, to which criminals get exiled. The book references many elements of Caribbean culture, including its carnival tradition (hence the title's Robber Queen) and ...


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Kissing teeth, or the "velaric ingressive airstream involving closure at two points in the mouth" may be considered disrespectful and a culpable expression of contempt. It is banned in many French schools and at one time was liable to result in arrest in Britain if done by someone being questioned by police. French schools ban teeth-sucking


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The poem is a nod to the use of Caribbean creoles in the novel. My best source for this is actually something I found as one of the top hits when I searched the web for david findlay stolen in the hope of finding the full text of the poem. Here's an essay by Nalo Hopkinson herself (previously published on this defunct site) in which she explains some of the ...


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