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43

It's a nonce word and is used only in Finnegans Wake. Joyce intentionally made it long probably to catch readers' attention and persuade them to read his novel (Finnegans Wake). It's defined by Your Dictionary as: Bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk: (nonce) A sound which represents the ...


28

One of the big problems in written English is representing spoken conversation. When someone speaks, they typically emphasize certain words. HTML even provides a tag for this: The placement of stress emphasis changes the meaning of the sentence. The element thus forms an integral part of the content. The precise way in which stress is used in this way ...


27

The spelling "Bool-var" is an attempt to render the French pronunciation of boulevard, in which the 'e' in the middle and the 'd' at the end are silent: /bul.vaʁ/ (in IPA). In the English pronunciation, the 'e' and the 'd' are not silent: /ˈbuː.ləˌvɑːd/ or /ˈbʊləvɑɹd/. There are many well-known boulevards in Paris, such as the Boulevard Haussmann ...


26

The Kentucky Age for 10th February 1857 contains a short story which opens as follows: A celebrated wit once said he had found out a patent “slip button,” so that when a bore laid hold of him, and was detaining him with a long story, he had only to slip the button, leaving it in the bore’s fingers, and make his escape. The contrivance was an ingenious and ...


24

The context is that Lucy is “’ollerin’ and carryin’ on” (that is, crying) because she is unhappy at the prospect of killing the rabbit: Lucy began to cry. She had not lived all her life on a farm for nothing and she knew very well that everything her father had said was right. But she was upset by the idea of killing the rabbit in cold blood. Richard Adams (...


22

“If the court knows herself” is a catch-phrase referencing a joke that was popular in mid-19th-century America. The earliest version of the joke that I have been able to find is from 1853: When a Kentucky judge, some years since, was asked by an attorney, upon some strange ruling, “Is that law, your honour?” he replied, “If the court understand herself, and ...


21

It means that the horse and buggy was not yet obsolete. "Going the way of the horse and buggy" implies becoming outmoded and useless, because cars have replaced horse-drawn carriages. But in 1903, when I was but a wee lad, the horse and buggy was still the prevalent mode of transport. It had not yet been replaced by the "horseless carriage&...


21

Just glossing the last two lines. No want of conscience hold it that I call Her love, for whose dear love I rise and fall. The main difficulty is with “No want of conscience hold it”. This is an anastrophe—a figure of speech in which the normal word order of subject, verb, and object, is changed. Rearranged into the usual order, it becomes an instruction ...


20

“Three-part” means “three-quarter”: three-part, adj. b. = three parts, n. three parts, n. Three out of four equal parts, three quarters. Oxford English Dictionary. “Three-quarter moon” means “gibbous moon”, that is, a moon that is more than half but less than fully illuminated. A citation for this sense: the greater part of the bright side is seen, and it ...


18

"It is not meet" basically means "it is not appropriate" or even "it is not right" (probably a better interpretation in this context). He's saying, more or less, that they shouldn't just leave Arthur in the state he's in, but someone should stay with him. Meet, as defined in Lexico: [archaic] Suitable; fit; proper. It doesn't ...


17

The quote is a parody of the folklore motif known as the king in disguise. In Norse mythology Odin was said to wander in disguise among humans. Shakespeare used the king-in-disguise motif in Act 4, scene 1 of Henry V. Outside of fiction, a number of real kings and queens have been said to disguise themselves, e.g. King Charles XI of Sweden (1655 – 1697), who ...


17

Quoting Wikipedia After the outbreak of World War I the Defence of the Realm Act was passed by Parliament in 1914. One section of the Act concerned the hours pubs could sell alcohol, as it was believed that alcohol consumption would interfere with the war effort. It restricted opening hours for licensed premises to luncheon (12:00 to 14:40) and supper (18:...


15

The speaker in the poem is a single woman who entertains married men. Comparing her position as "the other woman" to the men's domestic life, the speaker imagines that they probably praise her to their wives. This praise could be the men's justification for their affair, claiming that they were carried away by the speaker's charms and also ...


14

Mother Goose, in fact. Little Miss Muffet Sat on a tuffet, Eating her curds and whey; Along came a spider, Who sat down beside her, And frightened Miss Muffet away. It has the spider, the fright, and being Mother Goose, the pop-cultural awareness for the reader to recognize.


14

There are a nauseatingly numerous amount of theories on what that illustriously ambiguous line could mean. It very well might have merely been indented by Dante to represent a sort of invocation (and legibility is not usually the most overwhelming of necessities when clucking one's lips on an Invocation). The chant most likely refers to the Triumph of Satan. ...


14

In context, Mr. Darcy is replying to Miss Bingley, who has just accused Elizabeth Bennet of employing a “very mean art”: “Elizabeth Bennet,” said Miss Bingley, when the door was closed on her, “is one of those young ladies who seek to recommend themselves to the other sex by undervaluing their own; and with many men, I dare say, it succeeds. But, in my ...


13

Bwa Bach (“Little Bow”) was a nickname for Morfudd’s husband Cynfrig Cynin, referring perhaps to his crooked or hunched back. His jealousy of Dafydd led to the latter being exiled from his home in Ceredigion (“society and its goods are closed to me”). The lines quoted in the question are: Yn glaer deg, yn eglur dôn. Nac aro di, nac eiriach, Nac ofna er Bwa ...


13

The “war of seventy” refers to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, and this is confirmed by the mention of Otto von Bismarck, the Chancellor of the North German Confederation at the outbreak of the war, and from 1871 the Chancellor of the German Empire. So the “cross” must be the Iron Cross, a military decoration created in Napoleonic-era Prussia, and revived ...


13

You're right, "I'm glad you think it's funny" is used sarcastically. It is almost always used in that way. For example, if I trip and fall and you start laughing, I might say to you: "I'm glad you think it's funny." Presumably Athena is laughing at Dexter's having been caught in a tedious conversation, and he is responding to her laughter ...


12

The meaning of "up yourself" being "conceited" ("being up your own ass" or "up yourself") from @skooba and @Michael Finn is correct, but neither answer fully captures the particular context you have mentioned (Sorry Skooba, but I disagree with your interpretation): Why is it that: "They wouldn’t know if they were [conceited] if they didn’t have a ...


12

Elrond is saying it was not chance but Providence that brought them all together. To expand on Glorfindel's correct answer, let me explain the passage phrase by phrase. This is actually pretty important in terms of understanding Tolkien's theology of Middle-earth. That [what shall we do with the Ring] is the purpose for which you are called hither. Called, ...


12

Ahh yes, the impeccable word: bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur- nuk! only opposed by Shakespeare's honorificabilitudinitatibus and the timelessly delightful supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Anyways back to your question: It is a biblical word coined in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake which is ...


12

The narrator of he poem seems to be a mistress to married men. Since it's unusual for a mistress to have multiple lovers at the same time, I think she's figuratively representing most mistresses, not just one woman. She gives the men sexual pleasure greater than they get from their wives, and she maintains her home cleaner than their homes, and she doesn't ...


11

Mr Darcy means that women sometimes use tactics to attract men. He says that such tactics show a certain cunning on the part of the women using them. He thinks that anything that uses cunning is worthy of contempt; cunning is thought of as sly and underhand. Meanness doesn't mean spite, as it does today. It means something small and unworthy. So Mr Darcy is ...


11

The phrase is ‘the sword so often quoted’ and refers to the Sword of Damocles, which in turn refers to the: moral parable popularized by the Roman philosopher Cicero in his 45 B.C. book “Tusculan Disputations.” Cicero’s version of the tale centers on Dionysius II, a tyrannical king who once ruled over the Sicilian city of Syracuse during the fourth and ...


11

Shakespeare's Sonnet 151 is one of his most difficult sonnets. The meaning and logic of the poem are unclear even to scholars. It is also one of the most bawdy poems, not just of the sequence, but in the entire corpus of canonical English literature. As a result, it is hard to explain without some frank terminology. Be warned: this answer has some NSFW ...


11

“Branch of Ares” is a literal translation of “ὄζος Ἄρηος”, for example in the passage quoted in the question: οὐκ οἶος, ἅμα τῷ γε Λεοντεὺς ὄζος Ἄρηος υἱὸς ὑπερθύμοιο Κορώνου Καινεΐδαο: τοῖς δ᾽ ἅμα τεσσαράκοντα μέλαιναι νῆες ἕποντο. Homer. The Iliad, book II, lines 745–747. Oxford University Press (1920). “Branch” here means “descendant”: it is a metaphor ...


11

The meaning of "as it was" has been asked about on the English Language & Usage Stack Exchange site in 2013: Meaning of “as it was” in context. In short, "as it was" is the past tense of "as it is", here used in the second of the two senses given by Merriam-Webster: 2 : with the situation that exists now We have enough to ...


10

It transpires that part of the confusion with this sentence arises from a difference in the text between the first UK publication in the Strand magazine of September 1917 and the later collected stories as published in book form. The Strand edition says (my emphasis) 'you are joining up with your old service' The story takes place on the 2nd of July 1914, ...


10

The meaning is literally 'spit': Spitting for baseball players is like blinking; it's going to be a tough habit to break. It's not even just spitting on the ground. You know, a lot of us have routines and habits — you know, you spit a little bit in your glove before a pitch. It's got to be a conscious effort from everyone. And, you know, we're going to have ...


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