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19

It means that the horse and buggy was not yet obsolete. "Going the way of the horse and buggy" implies becoming outmoded and useless, because cars have replaced horse-drawn carriages. But in 1903, when I was but a wee lad, the horse and buggy was still the prevalent mode of transport. It had not yet been replaced by the "horseless carriage&...


5

Dickens is describing Pip's first encounter with a convict, Magwitch. in a coarse gray This is shorthand for "coarse gray cloth". It is uncommon, but not unfamiliar, in English to describe clothes by the cut of their cloth. So you might say of a wealthy lady that she was "in a fur" or "in furs" to mean a fur coat. In fact, I ...


4

In the context of this sentence, "raw" refers to the weather. The following definition from Wiktionary applies here: Unpleasantly cold or damp. So Pip is saying that the weather that evening was unpleasantly cold or damp. (Later in the same chapter, the escaped convict is described as "glancing about him over the cold wet flat". The ...


1

Let’s take the trees first. The “under-natures” are the undersides of the leaves, which are “turned up” (made visible) by the wind, and since the undersides are paler than the upper surfaces of the leaves, this makes the whole tree appear paler, “blanching” it. The leaves “tremble” (vibrate) in the air currents, and the whole tree “dilates” (spreads out, ...


1

I am a NZ poet who knew Hone. Here is the answer you seek from Auckland University, NZ: Elizabeth DeLoughrey, "Solar Metaphors: ‘No Ordinary Sun’", ka mate ka ora: a new zealand journal of poetry and poetics 6 (2008) Although this poem does not once mention nuclear weaponry, ‘No Ordinary Sun’is universally interpreted as an allegory of atomic ...


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