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5

I believe it means "entrée" but I am not entirely sure why Agatha Christie wrote ongtray instead. Checking the meaning of "entrée": The main course of a meal. 1.1 British A dish served between the first and main courses at a formal dinner. The right to enter or join a particular sphere or group. - Lexico (2) fits the context. Additionally,...


5

If you look at some of the pictures from the Funeral you will see that while the flags that are on vertical flag poles are flying at half mast as a mark of respect, flags that are on angled or horizontal poles, eg hanging out over streets, which cannot be 'half masted' are instead 'looped in' at the end so that they do not fly free. It isn't universal, you ...


4

One of the central themes of the story is how the protagonist's daughter closely resembles his wife at a similar age. He begins the story by describing his relationship with his wife, all the way from the beginning to now, particularly dwelling on the sexual parts. This segues naturally into discussing his daughter, whose teenage self he introduces into the ...


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In the winter, the Parish Clerk goes to tea with the Methodists. The vicar turns a blind eye to this: in the winter-time, when it was too dark for the vicar to observe [...] which [...] he was never anxious to do.


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The "black-clad, pale-skinned, basically depressed-looking, given to eyeliner" definitely describes the goth stereotype. For example, take this character from the British TV show The IT Crowd, where most characters are caricatures of stereotypes: Checks all the boxes (though maybe not depressed-looking in this picture). Thanks to the links from Rand al'...


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In the context of the story - which can be read in full online - the narrator, Jonathan, is describing the history of his relationship with his wife Saoirse. He describes her attractiveness (in some lascivious detail) and then mentions that he too was good-looking: We got married when Saoirse was twenty-one and I was twenty-three. That seems impossibly ...


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It's a hyphen, not a dash, so its function is not to mark a pause. At first glance the word "light" might be taken to mean "intellectually or spiritually less than profound", in the sense that one might write of "Shakespeare-light" or "light entertainment". That is the usual meaning of appending "-light" to a word. But here I think the poet is calling up an ...


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