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39

Deliberately steering clear of academic criticism, since that's what you asked for (granted, not what you answered and therefore presumably not the intended meaning of the question. Badum tish.): the author has said that they didn't mean for their work to suggest that. There are various ways you could nevertheless be right: The author might be lying: ...


35

It is a punning reference to the phrase ‘trip the light fantastic’, which means (per The Phrase Finder) To dance, especially in an imaginative or 'fantastic' manner. The phrase seems to arise from the works of Milton, in Comus he wrote, as you have already seen, Come, knit hands, and beat the ground, In a light fantastic round. And in L’Allegro Come, ...


33

In-universe the "light fantastic" is an actual, factual thing. There was no real need for the torches. The Octavo filled the room with a dull, sullen light, which wasn’t strictly light at all but the opposite of light; darkness isn’t the opposite of light, it is simply its absence, and what was radiating from the book was the light that lies on ...


23

First off, this appears in an 1879 essay about the writer William Thackeray by Anthony Trollope. What it means is perhaps clearer in its original context: I hold that gentleman to be the best dressed whose dress no one observes. I am not sure but that the same may be said of an author's written language. Only, where shall we find an example of such ...


22

(I previously posted this as an answer to this question, but Hamlet wanted to focus on actual textual analysis rather than discussing the intent issue, so I've separated this out into a new Q&A) It's easy, even for people familiar with literary analysis, to conflate asking "Did the author mean this?" with "Does the work mean this?". As you'd expect ...


22

Here’s a bit more context from chapter 6: He [Frodo] turned round and listened, and soon there could be no doubt: someone was singing a song; a deep glad voice was singing carelessly and happily, but it was singing nonsense: Hey dol! merry dol! ring a dong dillo! Ring a dong! hop along! fal lal the willow! Tom Bom, jolly Tom, Tom Bombadillo! ...


17

All three phrases show up on page 40 of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy in a single sentence. "He was waiting for a connect, working a letterbox maybe, or trailing his coat and looking for a pass from a mug like me." The entire paragraph is: Once more it was Smiley's turn to receive the heat of Tarr's charm: "So what's it all about, Mr. Smiley? See what I ...


17

It means "noose" - figuratively, hanging. @BeastlyGerbil's answer is correct, but for completeness I checked for other uses of the word "halter" in the Entire Gutenberg Twain Files (warning: slow to load!) The court informed him that a sheriff had been appointed to do the hanging, and— Capt. Ned's patience was at an end. His wrath was boundless. The ...


16

In the book In To Kill a Mockingbird, Boo Radley (The one who killed Bob Ewell) and Tom Robinson are seen as "mockingbirds". Atticus said previously in the book that it is "wrong to kill a mockingbird as they do nothing for us other than sing their hearts out". Heck Tate realizes that Jem didn't kill Bob Ewell but it was in fact Boo Radley. Heck already ...


15

Your surmise appears to be correct. Unfortunately, I only was able to find this quoted, not in English translations of Luther himself, however, where it is quoted, it is better understood, if the quote is extended to include previous sentence: "God creates out of nothing. Therefore, until a man is nothing, God can make nothing out of him." // Christianity ...


14

There appear to be multiple ways of reading this sentence, depending on how you interpret the context of "rest" and "silence". Hamlet has been experiencing a great deal of upset and distress during the course of the play. Enough to drive him to madness. So one possible reading of this sentence is that the "silence" of death will finally allow him to "rest". ...


14

This is a very subtle piece of wordplay, so it makes for an excellent question. The meaning, believe it or not, is God, and your answer "damn". This is analysed in An Ingenious Jest in Byron's "Don Juan", a paper by John I. Ades in Papers on Language and Literature 24(4) (1988), p. 446. The Hebrew sacred name for God is YHVH, usually vocalized as "Yahweh" ...


13

If you read the entire poem, the speaker is complaining to his friend that every Tom, Dick, and parson who can dip a quill thinks he or she is a poet, and then brings or sends the poem to him for his opinion. Is there a parson, much bemus'd in beer, A maudlin poetess, a rhyming peer, A clerk, foredoom'd his father's soul to cross, Who pens a ...


13

This is a sign of hostility. Times are hard between the Starks and Tyrion at this time, since Tyrion is suspected for trying to murder Bran earlier in the book. The scene that follows between Rob and Tyrion is filled with hostile comments, glares, and movements. This is hinted at in the unsheathed sword quote; the hospitality laws are very important in ...


13

It means his head. See definition 2.1 of "crown" at Oxford Dictionaries: The top part of a person's head or a hat: ‘his hair was swept straight back over his crown’ This is confirmed when you look at later verses of the same poem which have been included in some editions: Up Jack got, and home did trot As fast as he could caper; To old Dame Dob,...


13

Pope is using the word ‘expletive’ in this sense: A word or phrase that fills out a sentence or metrical line without adding anything to the sense; a word or phrase serving as a grammatical place-filler. Oxford English Dictionary. ‘Expletive’, n. sense B.1.a. (This sense later evolved into the modern sense of the word, “an emphatic exclamation with which a ...


13

As it has been suggested that it would be useful to identify all of the Allusions in the quoted piece, I've edited this answer to include further information. And made some discoveries along the way. Regular, the romin - insulting the kottage injins The start of this extract begins with a reference to Marcus Atilius Regulus, the roman who defeated the ...


12

The most likely answer, courtesy of Merriam-Webster: : the highest part: such as a : the topmost part of the skull or head Other possible interpretations according to Albert Jack's Pop Goes the Weasel: The Secret Meaning of Nursery Rhymes: One popular suggestion for its origin is that Louis XVI of France and his queen, the infamous Marie ...


12

TL;DR: FitzGerald made it up. Why? We don't know. As I expected, the translations of Rubaiyat are all over the place when it comes to sticking to the original text. First, I came across an analysis or FitzGerald's translation, which says the following: The sense here is presumably one of a disembodied Voice calling from the Great Unknown. But, this ...


12

I haven't (yet) read the novel in question, but I can explain the passage's simple meaning as a fluent English speaker. Let's take this apart, one piece at a time. By Jove! As one of the commenters mentioned, "by Jove!" is an exclamation, similar to "By God!". In fact, according to Wiktionary, the term comes from another name for the god Jupiter. he'd ...


12

He emphatically will not visit the city again. I’m damned if informal Used to say that you will certainly not do something “I’m polite to his ex-wife when I meet her, but I’m damned if I’m going to invite her over for dinner” https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/i-m-damned-if He’s saying, “I swear that I will not visit the ...


12

TL;DR: A ‘daffy-down-dilly’ is a lawyer who engages in double dealing, that is, representation of both sides in a case, for his own advantage. The reference is to a case reported in Rolle’s abridgment of the Common Law: Si home dit al un Counceller del ley en le North, Thou art a Daffa-down-dilly. Action giſt ove averrment que les parols ſignifie que il eſt ...


12

The meaning of "up yourself" being "conceited" ("being up your own ass" or "up yourself") from @skooba and @Michael Finn is correct, but neither answer fully captures the particular context you have mentioned (Sorry Skooba, but I disagree with your interpretation): Why is it that: "They wouldn’t know if they were [conceited] if they didn’t have a ...


11

To approach this question, it's worth looking at the entirety of the passage that precedes it: The stolen and perverted writings of Homer and Ovid, of Plato and Cicero, which all men ought to contemn, are set up by artifice against the Sublime of the Bible; but when the New Age is at leisure to pronounce, all will be set right, and those grand works of ...


11

First we need to understand what the "Deep Magic" is/represents, before moving to the "Deeper Magic." We know from chapter 13 of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe that the Deep Magic is written in several places (on the Stone Table, on the Scepter of the Emperor-beyond-the-Sea, etc.). We also know from that chapter that it defines what Justice requires....


11

Keats may have chosen the first two of these specific poisons because he could associate them with grapes and wine, and he may have chosen yew-berries because they look like beads. The first poison is: Wolf's-bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine, and in mythology, Medea gave Theseus a cup of wine poisoned by wolfsbane. The second poison is ...


11

The song has many verses, some of which varied in different performances. Even sticking to the "canonical" verses used in the Jeff Buckley version, however, there's demonstrably no one consistent "you" being referred to between verses. This can be shown by the fact that the "you" in the second verse seems to be a composite of Sampson and King David himself, ...


11

It is a more direct way of phrasing a reasonably common biblical theme (e.g. 2 Kings 4:6) of "empty vessels". Not only in Judaeo-Christian scripture, but in many religions and philosophical writings it is repeated that one must become an empty vessel, to be filled with either knowledge, Holy Spirit, or other things regarded as good. This concept transcends ...


11

When people actually sent telegraphs, they were charged at so much per word. Therefore a prudent correspondent would pare the words down to the minimum necessary to communicate information. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegram_style#Example Telegram style, telegraph style, telegraphic style or telegraphese[1] is a clipped way of writing that attempts to ...


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