18 votes
Accepted

Was there a specific being the "Lord of the Flies" was based on?

"Lord of the Flies" is a direct reference to Beelzebub (from the Hebrew ba'al z'vuv, בעל זבוב, literally "lord of flies.") Beelzebub is well known as a dark god, a demon, or another name for Satan ...
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  • 2,980
15 votes
Accepted

What was the irony of the end of Lord of The Flies?

The ironies are of juxtaposition. First, Ralph had created a signal fire in order to bring rescuers. However it is not this fire which attracts attention but the raging forest fire set to kill Ralph. ...
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  • 14.4k
14 votes

What is the symbolism of the conch in Lord of the Flies?

The conch symbolizes leadership and civilization throughout the story. In the beginning, Ralph uses it as an extension of his power. For example from the first chapter after he is elected. Ralph ...
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13 votes
Accepted

Why is there an odd use of question marks in Lord of the Flies?

With appropriate vocal inflection, any statement can be turned into a question. Typically, this would have been done by ending with a rising vocal pitch, rather than a falling one. So he is asking the ...
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  • 1,801
12 votes

Did the Lord of the Flies have any kind of religious reference more specific than just the Devil?

The entire book can be seen as an allegory for the Bible. It has a startlingly large number of allusions to Jewish and Christian myths and stories. Here are some of them: The island, in the ...
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  • 4,179
11 votes
Accepted

Did Piggy participate in the killing of Simon?

Did Piggy and Ralph participate? The current answers range from "Yes" (but maybe no) to "Probably" (maybe, maybe not) to "Ralph did but not Piggy". I'd like to explain ...
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10 votes
Accepted

Is Simon epileptic?

Dictionary definition of Epilepsy: A neurological disorder marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical ...
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10 votes
Accepted

What does it mean when Ralph is thinking about Piggy's death in Lord of the Flies by Golding

In terms of literal description, the whiteness refers to the foaming of the sea water as it washes over the rock. The rock is first described when Ralph crosses the neck to the Castle Rock: Now he ...
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  • 15.3k
9 votes

Is there really a nuclear war in the world of "The Lord of the Flies"?

Chapter 1: from Piggy "Didn't you hear what the pilot said? About the atom bomb? They're all dead."
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  • 99
9 votes

What was the irony of the end of Lord of The Flies?

The naval officer represents man's woefully-misguided denial of evil. It's so far off the mark, it's tragic. His arrogance echoes that of the boys, whose abominable underestimation of evil took a ...
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8 votes

Is there really a nuclear war in the world of "The Lord of the Flies"?

It's admittedly been a little while since I read the book, but I don't think that we have to assume that it was nuclear. The book is quite explicit that there was some kind of war, and the implication ...
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8 votes

Did Piggy participate in the killing of Simon?

Probably. This is the last mention of Piggy before Simon's death: Piggy and Ralph, under the threat of the sky, found themselves eager to take a place in this demented but partly secure society. ...
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  • 4,179
7 votes

Did Piggy participate in the killing of Simon?

Yes This is Simon's death: The sticks fell and the mouth of the new circle crunched and screamed. The beast was on its knees in the centre, its arms folded over its face. It was crying out against ...
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7 votes

Is Jack (in Lord of the Flies) actually 'bad'?

I know this is more of a chapter than an answer, but bear with me! If you would prefer a more concise version, just can stick to this first paragraph. Everyone in Lord of the Flies is "bad", ...
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6 votes
Accepted

Why does Piggy's accent not matter?

Perhaps this serves to reinforce the idea that these children are very far from the society and norms they grew up with. The children don't care about the sociological trappings of class and wealth ...
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6 votes

Is Simon epileptic?

Nigel Williams, a first-hand witness of Golding's life and work, stated in this 2012 Telegraph article: He was quite clear that Simon, the epileptic boy who falls down in a fit in front of the ...
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  • 1,818
6 votes

Who did Simon represent during his conversation with the beast?

There are many ways Simon can be seen as a Christ figure. Among the largest scale ones are: Simon is never violent, and he never becomes as savage as the others Simon always helps other people and ...
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  • 4,179
6 votes

Is The Lord of the Flies set on a real island?

The island is never named. We get pretty close: “This is our island. It’s a good island. Until the grownups come to fetch us we’ll have fun.” However, the island is never named and we also don'...
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  • 4,179
6 votes

Did the Lord of the Flies have any kind of religious reference more specific than just the Devil?

Existing answers have covered a few of these concepts, but there was plenty of Christian iconography apart from the devil who promoted evil among mankind. The island itself, particularly Simon's ...
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5 votes

Did the Lord of the Flies have any kind of religious reference more specific than just the Devil?

The allusions mentioned above are true in some regard; although, some clarity could be made about the Christian idea of sin. Christianity affirms that each individual has the choice of, even the ...
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  • 51
5 votes

Why does Piggy's accent not matter?

But the accent does matter, the quote goes: [...] Piggy was an outsider, not only by accent, which did not matter, but by fat... So, while the boys probably aren't as judgmental as the "grown-ups"...
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  • 51
4 votes

Why is there an odd use of question marks in Lord of the Flies?

Speaking with a rising inflection or turning everything into a question is known as uptalk or upspeech or, to get technical, high rising terminal. To some people, it projects uncertainty, but ...
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  • 1,015
4 votes

Is there really a nuclear war in the world of "The Lord of the Flies"?

I remember seeing an interview with the publisher back when I studied it in school. In the original draft first chapter outlined a nuclear war and was implied to be a bit over the top, most publishers ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Did Jack's tribe view themselves as savages?

I think they view themselves as savages, and are proud of it. Based on their subsequent behaviour, Jack's gang shed all moral restraint by the time they kill a mother pig. Given the way they ...
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4 votes

Did Jack's tribe view themselves as savages?

Earlier, Jack did not think they were savages: “I agree with Ralph. We’ve got to have rules and obey them. After all, we’re not savages. But later they become more savage and the book starts ...
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  • 4,179
3 votes

What is the symbolism of the conch in Lord of the Flies?

The conch establishes Piggy's inferiority to the reader early on, providing the basis for his exclusion from the island society, such as physiognomy (judgement of character via appearance), non-...
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2 votes

Did Piggy participate in the killing of Simon?

I think that Ralph participated but Piggy didn't since it said that he didn't really see what they did to Simon. "You were outside. Outside the circle. You never really came in. Didn't you see ...
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1 vote

Can we assume the 'Savages' go unpunished?

I think it's implied that some sort of conflict or war is occurring while the boys are on the island, which prevents them from being found earlier. So the answer would depend on the condition of the ...
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