19 votes

Is there a name for the literary device in the expression "Thanks, I hate it."?

The word “thanks” is not intended sincerely, so this is irony: irony, n. 1.a. The expression of one’s meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or ...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
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13 votes

Is there a name for the literary device in the expression "Thanks, I hate it."?

I'd say "sarcasm", rather than "irony", though perhaps the language has drifted since I was younger.
paul garrett's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

'Wild-bee hours' and 'wild-parrot days' in Sarojini Naidu's "A Rajput Love Song"

This is a kind of double hypallage, “a figure of speech in which there is an interchange of two elements of a proposition”. So, for example, the first line: Haste, O wild-bee hours, to the gardens of ...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
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4 votes

What figure of speech is "trèfles de braise" in "The Hunchback of Notre-Dame"?

Perhaps the phrase can be regarded as a transferred epithet or hypallage. Hypallage is a figure of speech wherein a descriptor (epithet) appropriate to a certain noun is applied (transferred) to a ...
verbose's user avatar
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4 votes

What figure of speech is "trèfles de braise" in "The Hunchback of Notre-Dame"?

The figure of speech is a metaphor. One definition of metaphor is: A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable. Since what ...
Peter Shor's user avatar
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3 votes

Was pretending to be an abridgement of a made-up work invented by William Goldman?

This technique is arguably as old as the novel itself! Don Quixote employs a literary device where Cervantes suggests the story is a translation of an earlier Arabic work: One day, as I was in the ...
TenthJustice's user avatar
2 votes

Can plot development analysis (climax, denouement, etc.) apply to smaller segments throughout a work?

In the abstract sense, storytelling is a fairly fractal craft, so you can zoom in and see smaller versions of the same structures at work at finer levels. The book itself has a climax, and so do ...
Oren Ashkenazi's user avatar
2 votes

Name for device in "Possessions" by Hart Crane?

A similar device is the basis of a traditional/anonymous British 17th century semi-nonsense poem, probably the one recalled by Peter Shor in comments: I saw a Peacock with a fiery tail I saw a ...
Peter LeFanu Lumsdaine's user avatar
1 vote

How does the figure of “dropping oil to catch the air-borne motes” work in George Eliot’s “The Spanish Gypsy”?

As I understand it your question is seeking an explanation of the metaphor of dropping the oil to catch the airborne motes and relating it to what Isidor might have done in reality to effect his ill ...
schweppz's user avatar
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