6

After some more searching, I found that the academic and author I was looking for is Frank Lentricchia. In literary theory and criticism he wrote, among other ones, the following books: After the New Criticism (University of Chicago Press, 1980), in which he reviews and evaluates the "critical theory" (not just literary theory, since he also discusses the ...


6

This is a core question for literature enthusiasts and I am glad you asked it. Certainly there are no objective criteria to differentiate 'literary fiction' from 'popular fiction.' Since much of literature discussion is necessarily subjective I shall try to answer your answer based on my own experience as a constant and dedicated reader of novels -- both ...


5

The article mentioned in the original version of the question is not "Boule de Suif" (which is a novella) but the article "Les Soirées de Médan" that Maupassant published in the newspaper Le Gaulois on 27 April 1880. At the time, de Maupassant was still unknown as an author. The "soirées" he talks about are evenings that several authors spent at the house ...


5

At least according to science fiction grandmaster Samuel Delany, well-known for "literary" books in popular genres, the distinction is largely one of anticipated audience. Popular fiction is generally aimed at a larger, more mainstream audience, and may feature simpler plots and language. It also typically follows one or another set of standard genre ...


4

Yvor Winters's book In Defense of Reason (1947, combining critical essays from three earlier books) contains very strong criticism of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Early in the book, he criticises Romanticism in general: The Romantics, however, although they offer a relatively realistic view of the power of literature, offer a fallacious and dangerous view of the ...


3

The boundaries of expectation set by a story's narration fall under the general heading of point of view. In itself, point of view is a simple concept: what is the relationship of the narrator to the narrative? Or more simply still, who's telling the story, and when? This simplicity itself reveals the foundational nature of point of view to the unfolding of ...


3

According to Hyatt Howe Wagoner's book, Emerson as Poet, ... the crucial fact about Emerson for Winters is that, as he says quite truly, “Emerson was the most influential preacher to appear in America after Edwards.” Unfortunately for later Americans, Winters thought, the content of Emerson's preaching was not just vacuous but pernicious, as Hart Crane's ...


2

In this thread I see a lot of references to phrases such as "human experience" and "the human condition". I think it's worth stepping back and asking whose experiences we are talking about. I believe, and hopefully I can show this in my answer, that the question of "whose experience" is the key to understanding the concepts of literary fiction and popular ...


2

"Literary Fiction" is a genre, like any other, with distinct emphasis (style, emotional impact, emphasis on the human condition.) It's worth noting that before the modern literary movement of the late 19th century, all literature was "genre" (epics, sagas, romances, histories, etc.) Hamlet is a revenge story, just like Euripides' Hecuba, and both are ...


2

TL;DR: The Tempest does not respect Aristotle’s unity of action, but to discover this you need to read Aristotle, and even literary critics sometimes neglect primary sources. Aristotle The unity of action comes from the Poetics of Aristotle: After these definitions we must next discuss the proper arrangement of the incidents since this is the first and most ...


2

The question asks, ‘Was Keats ever criticized for standardizing generic beauty?’ and the answer is ‘yes—indeed, he was criticized along these lines by his own fiancée, Fanny Brawne!’ The evidence for this appears in two letters from Keats to Brawne: Why may I not speak of your Beauty, since without that I could never have lov’d you?—I cannot conceive any ...


2

The simple answer is that he wasn't. Wikipedia's own article on the Geneva School makes no mention of him, and neither did most sources I consulted. The reason this error is present seems to be that while Thibaudet did not help found the Geneva School, he helped inspire said school. The source that clarified this was Theoretical Schools and Circles in the ...


1

The original French of this fragment can also be found on Gutenberg and goes as follows: Il se chargea d'écrire l'article du Gaulois et d'accord avec ses amis, il le rédigea dans les termes que l'on sait, brodant et enjolivant, cédant sans violence à un goût naturel pour une mystification qu'innocentait sa jeunesse. L'essentiel, disait-il, est de ...


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