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After some more searching, I found that the academic and author I was looking for is Frank Lentricchia. In literary theory and criticism he wrote, among other ones, the following books: After the New Criticism (University of Chicago Press, 1980), in which he reviews and evaluates the "critical theory" (not just literary theory, since he also discusses the ...


6

This is a core question for literature enthusiasts and I am glad you asked it. Certainly there are no objective criteria to differentiate 'literary fiction' from 'popular fiction.' Since much of literature discussion is necessarily subjective I shall try to answer your answer based on my own experience as a constant and dedicated reader of novels -- both ...


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At least according to science fiction grandmaster Samuel Delany, well-known for "literary" books in popular genres, the distinction is largely one of anticipated audience. Popular fiction is generally aimed at a larger, more mainstream audience, and may feature simpler plots and language. It also typically follows one or another set of standard genre ...


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The simple answer is that he wasn't. Wikipedia's own article on the Geneva School makes no mention of him, and neither did most sources I consulted. The reason this error is present seems to be that while Thibaudet did not help found the Geneva School, he helped inspire said school. The source that clarified this was Theoretical Schools and Circles in the ...


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In this thread I see a lot of references to phrases such as "human experience" and "the human condition". I think it's worth stepping back and asking whose experiences we are talking about. I believe, and hopefully I can show this in my answer, that the question of "whose experience" is the key to understanding the concepts of literary fiction and popular ...


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"Literary Fiction" is a genre, like any other, with distinct emphasis (style, emotional impact, emphasis on the human condition.) It's worth noting that before the modern literary movement of the late 19th century, all literature was "genre" (epics, sagas, romances, histories, etc.) Hamlet is a revenge story, just like Euripides' Hecuba, and both are ...


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