6

I assumed it might be a biblical reference, but upon checking, it doesn't seem that Rebecca was a slave. It is her, Rebecca. According to these comments to "Anna Karenina" (in Russian, search for 'genre' on that page to hit the comment about Ребекка): Стр. 130. ...в восточном строгом стиле, «genre рабыни Ребекки...» — Имеется в виду библейский тип ...


6

They really don’t. 1. The lie in question. Beauvoir didn’t provide insight of her own here, it’s a paraphrase of certain arguments from Fantasia of the Unconscious by D. H. Lawrence: Better Anna Karenin and Vronsky a thousand times than Natasha and that porpoise of a Pierre. This pretty, slightly sordid couple tried so hard to kid themselves that the ...


3

From Wikipedia: "A Letter to a Hindu" (also known as "A Letter to a Hindoo") was a letter written by Leo Tolstoy to Tarak Nath Das on 14 December 1908... The letter caused the young Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi to write to the world-famous Tolstoy to ask for advice and for permission to reprint the Letter in Gandhi's own South African ...


2

Because Levin appears first. Levin/Lyovin is the main character of the novel: it is not just about Anna and Vronsky! See LitCharts, for example: Levin, the other main protagonist of the novel (besides Anna)… Screenwriting guru Michael Hauge in his article on romcom structure pointed out (it seems it’s not on the web anymore, Russian translation is here): ...


1

The obvious reason why War and Peace is usually described as a novel and not as an epic is that verse is one of the defining characteristics of the epic. Applying the descriptor "epic" to novels is a relatively recent phenomenon in the history of literature. Since the question cites Britannica in support of the claim that War and Peace is an epic, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible