15

The text This is a translation in verse, so don't set too much store on the exact wording. Some of the words may have been chosen for rhythm and rhyme rather than for precise meaning. For reference, here's the Latin original (or at least one of the preserved Latin texts, I don't know if we know what the exact original is): Montis in excelsi scopulo, rex ...


14

Ulysses is the Latin form of the Greek Odysseus, stemming from the Sicilian or alternate Latin form Ulixes. The first instance of these forms in literature that I can find is in the Odusia by Livius Andronicus. This is an early translation of the Odyssey (third century BC). The only parts of it that survive are 46 lines from 17 books of the Odyssey, but ...


11

I am not a linguist, but I think it's worth mentioning that the Odysseus→Ulysses transformation is a special case of something called the "Sabine L": some words that had "d" sounds in Old Latin (or in Greek) became "l" in later (classical) Latin. Examples include: lacrima in Latin from Old Latin dacrima, from Greek dakry from PIE *dakru- from which both ...


8

The first one is a common abbreviation: q; stands for que in this case. A screenshot from Cappelli: The other one is a ligature: what you see is simply ct with a little arc connecting the letters. I don't know whether these exist in Unicode, nor do I know about type faces.


5

Let Psyche’s body be clad in mourning wed, And set on rock of yonder hill aloft: Her husband is no being of human seed, But serpent dire and fierce as might be thought. Who flies with wings above in starry skies, And doth subdue each thing with fiery flight. The gods themselves, and powers that seem so wise, With mighty Jove, be subject ...


5

To give you a proper answer, we need to define a few more terms than simply "literature". Such as what is meant by "texts". Defining "text", we need to understand whether or not inscriptions -- anything written or painted on walls, stones, or other objects -- are included. This extends the range from an illiterate person's ...


5

UPDATE: I have figured out where they got the quote form. Googling the original quote in Croatian shows that the line appears in the book Zlatna knjiga svjetske poezije za djecu by Zvonimir Balog, which Google translate says means The Golden Book of World Poetry for Children. MY ORIGINAL ANSWER, which shows that Jean de la Fontaine never wrote anything ...


5

tl;dr More's wordplay both creates a world and undercuts it. It allows More to tell an entirely plausible story with a straight face while simultaneously signaling that the story is false. It forms part of an intricate strategy of "self-fashioning and self-cancellation" (Greenblatt, p. 12) whereby More raises specific and dangerous questions about ...


5

That the sins committed by the mass public are unpunished and ignored. Sometimes people don't even recognize the actions as crimes but as social norms (ie downloading music off the internet). Also, sometimes the crime is so unusual there is not even a law for it, so then it becomes a question of moral punishment. Basically, if enough people do it, no one ...


4

The vast majority of his Fables have origins from Ancient Greece. For example, the earliest origins of The Mouse and the Oyster (Le Rat et l'Huître), fable 9 of Book VIII, come from a Greek Anthology poem in the 1st century AD by Antiphilus of Byzantium1. Another example, The Hawk and the Nightingale (Le Milan et le Rossignol), fable 18 of Book IX, derives ...


3

As I said in my comment above, Latin and English poetry are very different.  They both have multiple layers of depth and meaning, but in very different ways.  Firstly, meter in Latin is not based on stress but on long and short syllables.  This isn't even a thing in English, so a translation in meter is impossible.  Even translating it into an English meter ...


2

The typeface appears similar to those by Nicolas Jenson, a 15th-century typographer. The original typeface may not have a name (or the name may be lost to time), but there is a 21st-century typographer named Gilles Le Corre (GLC) who creates fonts that replicate 15th- and 16th-century typefaces. None of GLC's typefaces matches this one exactly, but several ...


2

After I contacted Simon Lancaster, he was gracious enough to respond: If you look at my own books, particularly Speechwriting: The Expert Guide, you'll find a ton of sources. Warm wishes, Simon The two resources that most stand out to me so far are Aristotle's Rhetoric and Cicero's Rhetoric ad Herennium, and I plan on tackling them next. I might mind the ...


2

Fama Fraternitatis is available in German at: Allgemeine und General-Reformation der ganzen weiten Welt beneben der Fama Fraternitatis on 12koerbe.de, Fama Fraternitatis des löblichen Ordens des Rosencreutzes on anthroweb.info (translation into modern German), Fama fraternitatis, oder, Entdeckung der Brüderschafft des löblichen Ordens dess Rosen Creutzes : ...


1

Online versions of the Greek text are available at: Ἑρμου του Τρισμεγιστου - ΠΟΙΜΑΝΔΡΗΣ on w66.eu, «ΕΡΜΗΣ Ο ΤΡΙΣΜΕΓΙΣΤΟΣ»: 240. – Ποιμάνδρης on Greek-Language.org, HERMÈS TRISMÉGISTE - Greek and French side by side. It is not clear whether these Greek texts incomplete, however; they are suspiciously short. A Latin version appears to be available on the ...


1

Tacitus's Agricola says, at the end of XXX: XXX. "... Auferre, trucidare, rapere, falsis nominibus imperium; atque, ubi solitudinem faciunt, pacem appellant." which is to say To ravage, to slaughter, to usurp under false titles, they call empire; and where they make a desert, they call it peace. It might be possible that Martial wrote something ...


1

In The Golden Ass, Cupid does not give any reason why explicitly. He simply forbid her: But he gave her a further charge saying, Beware that ye covet not (being moved by the pernicious counsel of you sisters) to see the shape of my person, lest by your curiosity you deprive your selfe of so great and worthy estate. When he realizes she disobeyed him, his ...


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