11

Yes, this character is John Uskglass. I've already answered this part on another SE site, and most of the same arguments apply here. Who else could he possibly be? A magician of great power, enough to revive the dead without fairy assistance, and who changed the writing upon Vinculus's body. Vinculus was the personification of the Raven King's book; the ...


7

At one point in the book (page 59 of the Kindle edition, in chapter 4) Drawlight states: He had an old uncle called Haythornthwaite who died and left him a world of money. Although there is no indication in the book as to whether Drawlight is telling the truth. He is, after all, something of a gossip. It does however seem that his wealth is inherited. ...


6

Corey Olsen discusses this a bit in his lecture series at Mythgard. (I strongly recommend it: he's quite gifted at close analysis, plus it's free.) He notes that most people compare it to Jane Austen, since that's the Regency author that most people are familiar with. It does fit her style well, but that of many other Georgian authors as well. In sum, he ...


5

I was doing a little research on the etymology of John recently. (I suspect that Riordan's "Jackson" is a reference to John, where "Jack" is a form of John, and Percy Jackson is likely meant to be "Perseus Son-of-the-Grace-of-God", which is a reflection both of his parentage and his deliverance as an infant cast out to sea.) The Online Etymological ...


3

I'm going to disagree with the other answer. I believe Mr. Norrell used magic to create his wealth. Norrell was a real magician, and a good one, at a time when there were at most a handful of other real magicians in England, none of whom publicly admitted to being able to do magic. Surely he could have figured out some way of creating or obtaining wealth. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible