13

It's been a while, but my recollection is that the idea was that Lennie 1) was ultimately dangerous and 2) killed a woman, albeit unintentionally. Lennie liked to pet rabbits because they were soft, but he killed them because he didn't understand nor could he control his strength. He did the same with the puppy he was given. Lennie simply didn't have the ...


8

According to this NYT Article, Steinbeck's wife Elaine asked him this very question. His answer was: "For one good reason. She's not a person, she's a symbol. She has no function, except to be a foil – and a danger to Lennie." The article was written by Jay Parini, who also wrote a biography about Steinbeck. Since there are no references in the article, ...


5

This website discusses the setting of the novel. Apparently Steinbeck never actually explicitly identified the country, although he said it was cold and stern like Norway, cunning and implacable like Denmark, reasonable like France. There are enough clues in it to narrow the possible countries down to Norway (unless you argue that Steinbeck just took ...


3

I think that 'good' and 'bad' are concepts which, whilst they appear quite basic on the surface, are too complex for Lennie to apply to his own motivations, though I suspect her recognises them in other people. Lennie is almost permanently in a state of fear and anxiety. He doesn't understand people and he doesn't understand the world. He understands that he ...


3

Everything Lauren-Clear-Monica-Ipsum writes is true. Lennie did indeed kill accidentally just because of his nature, and without understanding what he did or why. George does want to spare Lennie from the pain of a trial, a hanging, or a lynching. Yes, he could have led the lynch mob away. But George realizes an important thing. Even if he rescues Lennie now,...


2

‘Sylvia’ represents a nymph or shepherdess of Arcadia. Pastoral or Arcadian literature was a late-medieval and early-modern genre that romanticized the simplicity of rural life. Named after Arcadia, the home of the god Pan in Greek mythology, the genre depicts an uncorrupted wilderness peopled with satyrs and nymphs or shepherds and shepherdesses. Important ...


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