23

As asked, the question is difficult to answer. Several premises are open to question: What constitutes a "major work"? What is your definition of "sympathy" in this context? Whatever the definition, how sure are we that Milton is, in fact, sympathetic to Satan? Given that Henry VIII broke with the Catholic church in 1532 (barely a ...


16

Since Milton is often discussed in the context of Renaissance literature, I'll quote the definition of "epic" from The Renaissance (edited by Marion Wynne-Davies, Bloomsbury Guides to English Literature, Bloomsbury, 1992): A narrative of heroic actions, often with a principal hero, usually mythical in its content, offering inspiration and ...


6

Wordsworth thought that the phrase was a leap of pure imagination: Here is the full strength of the imagination involved in the word, hangs, and exerted upon the whole image: First, the Fleet, an aggregate of many Ships, is represented as one mighty Person, whose track, we know and feel, is upon the waters; but, taking advantage of its appearance to the ...


5

"Areopagitica" (1644) was written to argue against the Licensing Order of the previous year, which required that works had to be pre-approved by a censor before they could be printed. Some historical background is necessary to fully understand the passage. Until 1640, the Catholic monarch Charles I had claimed to be above parliament. During his ...


5

Keats’ debt to Milton in these lines was well observed. But Keats was not the only poet to borrow from Milton’s description of the swan! Borrowing from Milton It was probably Milton who first wrote (at any rate in English) that “The swan with arched neck Rows her state with oary feet;” but Keats has “The swan, his neck of arched snow, Oars himself along ...


3

The passage exploits multiple meanings of various words to make its statement that the power of beauty is dependent on the admiration of those it captivates. Stands means is held upright, in the usual meaning of the term, and contrasts with Fall flat and shrink a couple lines later. But it also suggests has standing, i.e., maintains a position of some worth. ...


3

Related: Is John Milton's Lucifer a tragic hero? One interesting feature of Paradise Lost is that the demons are presented as multi-dimensional, complicated characters - likely even more so than the "good" characters. You could even make a good case that Lucifer is a tragic hero. He certainly displays many heroic qualities - fortitude, charisma, ...


1

Milton commented on Luther's influence on him (from English Opinion of Luther, quoting Milton's An apology for Smectymnuus): John Milton confesses that he "had not examined through" Luther's works, and was certainly not deeply indebted to him. However, Milton mentions Luther by name several times in his works. According to Reason, Republic, ...


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