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Lines 1–33 of ‘Endymion’ form an introduction to the story, which starts at line 34: Therefore, ’tis with full happiness that I Will trace the story of Endymion. The only way to understand the word ‘Therefore’ in line 34 is that lines 1–33 consist of an argument as to why Keats should be happy to tell the story of Endymion. What is this argument? Well, ...


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What is Keats saying in the last three lines? Describing beauty, Keats says that beauty is also experienced in the grandeur and magnificence of the deaths of the mighty and powerful knights and kings (perhaps, though unlikely, any person who fights and did for a noble cause) who made supreme sacrifices and died noble deaths. Magnificent tales of their ...


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The question asks, ‘Was Keats ever criticized for standardizing generic beauty?’ and the answer is ‘yes—indeed, he was criticized along these lines by his own fiancée, Fanny Brawne!’ The evidence for this appears in two letters from Keats to Brawne: Why may I not speak of your Beauty, since without that I could never have lov’d you?—I cannot conceive any ...


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It is always difficult to prove a negative, but I doubt that ‘simple sheep’ is a biblical reference. I have two reasons for this doubt. First, in the Authorized Version (the translation with which Keats was most familiar) the word ‘simple’ is mainly used with the meaning ‘unsophisticated, ignorant, foolish’, for example: Psalm 119:130 The entrance of thy ...


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