31

TL;DR: The Longbourn estate is ‘entailed’ to male heirs only, whereas Rosings is not. Austen sets out the financial situation of the Bennets in detail: Mr. Bennet’s property consisted almost entirely in an estate of two thousand a year, which, unfortunately for his daughters, was entailed, in default of heirs male, on a distant relation; and their mother’...


18

She [Jane Austen] makes me detest all her people, without reserve. Is that her intention? It is not believable. Then is it her purpose to make the reader detest her people up to the middle of the book and like them in the rest of the chapters? That could be. That would be high art. It would be worth while, too. Some day I will examine the other end of her ...


15

First, we should note that Elizabeth is very specific here: she is only talking about her uncle and aunt, not of any other relatives. While it is perhaps natural that her thoughts should first go to those she was in company with, it is not so natural that they should not continue to her closer family. If it was a matter of shutting out all her family, then ...


11

The phrase needs to be understood as “as X as Anne could be” where X is “anxious to be left to walk with Mr. Elliot”. That is, Mrs. Clay wanted, just as much as Anne did, to walk alone with Mr. Elliot. The context is that Mr. Elliot, Miss Elliot, Anne, and Mrs. Clay are out walking in Bath when it starts raining. Mrs. Dalrymple offers to take them home in ...


10

Elinor owned about 1000 pounds (we are told this in chapter 2), Edward 2000. The interest from this would have been 150 pounds a year (5 percent was what you got from government bonds, so this is the golden standard when calculating interest. Austen used this herself, as will be seen). The living that Edward had been presented by Colonel Brandon generated ...


8

Let's have a look at what Mr Bennet actually says to Mary in the passage alluded to in the question: [Elizabeth] looked at her father to entreat his interference, lest Mary should be singing all night. He took the hint, and when Mary had finished her second song, said aloud, ``That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long ...


4

He had called in Camden Place; had called a second time, a third; had been pointedly attentive: "Called" here means "visited." Camden Place is the name of the building or location. The sentence means "He visited the house several times." if Elizabeth and her father did not deceive themselves, It's a rhetorical device: "Unless I'm wrong, here's what's ...


3

It means that that Mr. Bingley was content with renting Netherfield and probably never would get around to buying a house of his own. In other words, he would leave the purchase of a house to the next generation, just like his father.


3

The conversation with Admiral Croft follows soon (a couple of weeks) after Anne’s learning of the engagement in a letter from Mary. Since then, we imagine, she has hardly thought of anything else, because if Louisa is engaged to Captain Benwick, then Captain Wentworth is free to bestow his affections elsewhere: No, it was not regret which made Anne’s ...


3

There is at least one part of the question that is wrong - that Maria was of "proper education". This is, in fact, one of the main morals of the story - the education of Maria and Julia was actually seriously mishandled. While Sir Thomas Bertram has (according to the novel) a sound moral understanding and a willingness to pass this on to his offspring, he ...


3

'At York' as you have rightly remarked is far away from the scene of action. But York is figuratively used to mean a distant place; It metonymically describes any place far off, particular for the general. Lizzy doesn't care whosoever is around, she's oblivious of the surroundings and given to follow her own sweet will, all are removed from her reckoning to ...


2

JANE WAS RIGHT! The idea that Mr. Bennet could have barred the entail in Pride and Prejudice — thereby leaving Longbourn to his daughters — is surprisingly common. It is, however, wrong. Jane Austen understood the law of entail, and she described the Longbourn entail with great clarity. In my opinion as an attorney trained in trusts and estates law and ...


2

extraordinary circumstances attending their acquaintance This means “the unusual way in which they met”, that is, their chance encounter at Lyme in chapter 12. the right which he seemed to have to interest her This means “the expectation that she should be interested in marrying him”, the reasons for which are given in the successive clauses. by ...


2

The context of this passage is that Anne is worried about Lady Russell’s reaction to seeing Captain Wentworth in Bath. You will recall from chapter 4 that when Captain Wentworth proposed to Anne in 1806, eight years before the opening of the novel, Lady Russell saw it very differently. His sanguine temper, and fearlessness of mind, operated very ...


2

Darcy’s discoveries are ‘mortifying’ (humbling, humiliating) because they are wounding to his pride. The appearance of ‘pride’ in the title of the novel alerts us to the significance of this aspect of his character. Darcy is a man who is especially proud of his social position, family connection, and self-sufficiency. At the Meryton assembly in chapter 3, ...


2

When Elizabeth expressed her gratitude for “your unexampled kindness to my poor sister”, Mr. Darcy correctly understood her as referring, not just to his attendance at the wedding of Lydia and Mr. Wickham, but to his financial contributions that persuaded the groom to go through with it. In my opinion, Mr. Darcy did not suspect Lydia of betraying his ...


2

Every contribution from Fanny is attributed directly in the text. "It is the same sort of thing," said Fanny ... "Poor William! He has met with great kindness from the chaplain of the Antwerp," was a tender apostrophe of Fanny's, The main body of the conversation alternates between Edmund and Miss Crawford. There is one point at which it gets a ...


1

a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached. Mary's "pedantic air and conceited manner" made her playing less appreciated, and it would have done so even if she had played better than she actually did. (It's unclear to me whether the "pedantic air and conceited manner" was in her playing ...


1

One of the many senses of "mortify" is (according to Wiktionary) (transitive, usually used passively) To embarrass, to humiliate. To injure one's dignity. [from 17th c.] and it is easy to find examples of forms of this word being used this way in 18th-20th century writing. James Boswell, in his Life of Johnson, for instance, has Soon after this ...


1

Mrs. Smith had been carried away from her first direction, Her “first direction” was a severe attack on the character of Mr. Elliot (“a man without heart or conscience; a designing, wary, cold-blooded being, who thinks only of himself; whom for his own interest or ease, would be guilty of any cruelty, or any treachery, that could be perpetrated without risk”...


1

Mr. Elliot was not staying at Camden Place, but at another address in Bath. Mr. Elliot’s wife died in chapter 1: that’s why Elizabeth was wearing “black ribbons” for her, and why he was “in mourning” when seen at Lyme in chapter 12. His motive in renewing his acquaintance with his uncle and cousins is currently (as of chapter 15) a mystery. Anne considers ...


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