44

It's a nonce word and is used only in Finnegans Wake. I have no clue why Joyce made it so long (perhaps he wanted to catch readers' attention and persuade them to read Finnegans Wake). It's defined by Your Dictionary as: A sound which represents the symbolic thunderclap associated with the fall of Adam and Eve. About it's origin, YourDictionary says: A ...


44

James Joyce preferred dashes to quotation marks for aesthetic reasons. He even went so far as to call quotation marks "perverted commas". He remarks on his dislike of quotation marks at various places in his correspondences: I think the fewer the quotation marks the better.... The ‘ ’ are to be used only in the case of a quotation in full dress, I think, ...


14

It's called "quotation dashes," or "theater style," or "the continental manner." The latter term is because it's used (among several other styles, like < > ) by many languages common in continental Europe, but it's common enough in English that you'll find it in the writings of authors as diverse as William Faulkner, Philip K. Dick, and Cormac McCarthy. ...


12

Ahh yes, the impeccable word: bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur- nuk! only opposed by Shakespeare's honorificabilitudinitatibus and the timelessly delightful supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Anyways back to your question: It is a biblical word coined in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake which is ...


10

This question has been well discussed. See for example Kenner Chapter 13. Here is my take. All the quotes are from the penultimate chapter. That is the ending Bloom desires. Bloom gets the son he lost. Bloom desires Stephen to move in and rent Rudy's room. In Bloom's mind, Stephen can get singing lessons from Molly, tutor Molly in Italian, etc. Bloom dreams ...


10

TL;DR: Joyce criticized dramatic flaws in Hamlet, but never condemned the play as a “failure”. Summary Richard Ellman’s biography of Joyce makes it clear that Joyce thought Henrik Ibsen a better dramatist than Shakespeare, and in 1908 he criticized the dramatic aspects of Hamlet in a conversation with his brother Stanislaus. However this has to be balanced ...


8

Most of these aren't saying "whore". The one that does is "Hohore", which according to this page is actually "ho whore"; "ho" here is the exclamation. Also, note the r in "hore". The Oxford English Dictionary's earliest attestation for "hoe" (for any spelling without r) meaning "whore" is from the 1964 book Deep down in Jungle: Main who', best girlfriend....


8

I found some quotes from Wikipedia about how to read it. They seem to suggest that you should appreciate the rhythm more than anything. Eugene Jolas said: Those who have heard Mr. Joyce read aloud from Work in Progress know the immense rhythmic beauty of his technique. It has a musical flow that flatters the ear, that has the organic structure of ...


8

You are correct to point out that Joyce's use of the stream of consciousness technique developed over his career. While there are only inklings of it in his early work, there is quite a bit of it in Ulysses. Ulysses, however, is not the apogee of the stream of consciousness technique in Joyce. That spot is reserved for Finnegans Wake, a work in which Joyce ...


6

To add to andejons' answer regarding the Gilbert schema's technique of "gigantism", I'd suggest Joyce may also have been referencing, parodying or even honouring the 16th century Gargantua and Pantagruel by François Rabelais. It's the story, told over five books, of two giants, and is replete with numerous lists and catalogues, some of which go on for ...


6

According to the Gilbert schema for understanding Ulysses, created by Joyce for his friend Stuart Gilbert, the technique that is used in the "Cyclops chapter" (a designation that also comes from the schema) is "gigantism". This normally means the overgrowth of the entire body or certain parts of it, which seems an apt likeness for the kind of long lists the ...


5

It may have a double meaning. Perverse can iteslf mean showing a deliberate and obstinate desire to behave in a way that is unreasonable or unacceptable and contrary to the accepted or expected standard or practice. (both definitions from Oxford Languages via Google) Depictions of the Madonna predominantly show her with downcast eyes either in modesty or ...


5

To understand this, once needs to know a little Irish history. Essentially Ireland has been an island riven by violence almost continually for over a thousand years. First it was the Vikings, raiding, pillaging and settling. Then it was the Normans followed by the Tudors who, through the reformation, then lead a bloody, divisive series of religious wars ...


5

Because the statement "A key theme of the novel is Bloom's relative social isolation" is false. Answering this in the negative, when no evidence to the positive has been presented whatsoever, is bound to be difficult. Rationally, I should not proceed until such evidence has been provided. But here goes. Short Argument - "Reductio ad Absurdum via Occam's ...


4

Joyce's work was revolutionary in a number of ways. In most of them it was not that he innovated new techniques, but in the degree to which he pushed them. To start with, it is worth considering what the novel traditionally looked like at the end of the 19th century. Victorian literature was almost entirely written as a linear narrative with an omniscient ...


4

I found a quote that may be what you're remembering, or slightly misremembering. It's not from Joyce himself, but I think it's close enough to be worth posting as an answer. It concerns Work in Progress, the title Joyce used to refer to Finnegans Wake before its complete publication, and the idea that only twelve or thirteen people might be able to fully ...


4

tl;dr Stream of consciousness, partly; interior monologue, no. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is narrated largely through indirect discourse limited to Stephen Dedalus's point of view. Inasmuch as the narrative technique is third person, the novel does not use interior monologue, which by definition uses first person. However, as the question ...


3

I suspect that the ‘Outline of Chapter Contents’ was written by Seamus Deane, who edited the Joyce editions for Penguin in the early 1990s. The evidence I have for this is that the following editions all lack the ‘Outline’: This 1949 Faber & Faber edition. Note that it says “First published in mcmxx […] Reprinted in mcmxlvi, mcmxlviii and mcmxlix”. The ...


3

To respond to what I think is the core of your question, yes, it is possible to translate the style of old forms of literature while still being quite readable for a present day audience. However, there are a number of reasons why this is problematic and why Joyce would never have done so. Firstly, the passages here mimic a translated style, in doing so ...


2

As I understand it, Nuvoletta ... disappeared in the end of the excerpt. In Finnegans Wake, no one ever disappears, at least not for very long, because they always have to begin again! While the song you are studying misleadingly ends (159.6-10) Then Nuvoletta reflected for the last time in her little long life and she made up all her myriads of drifting ...


2

The idea of incompatibility due to social status certainly comes up later in the story, in the context of the relationship between Polly Mooney and Bob Doran: [Doran's] family would look down on her. First of all there was her disreputable father and then her mother's boarding house was beginning to get a certain fame. He had a notion that he was being ...


2

Parody of long lists in the original Odyssey or in epic poetry in general? The Odyssey grinds to a halt when the travelers arrive in Hades and see all the most beautiful women in history, both real and fictional. The Iliad has several catalogues. The most famous is the Catalogue of Ships in Book 2, some 250 lines just listing all the Greek commanders and ...


2

Warning: I don't know any Greek (ancient or modern), so trust this answer at your own risk. Dramaturge comes from Greek dramatourgos, which breaks down into drama + ourgós (worker). Similarly for thamaturge, from Greek thamatourgos, which breaks down into thamato (wonder) + ourgós. So egourgos (or egoourgos), which isn't a real Greek word, would presumably ...


2

When I put ulysses bloom circumcised into Google, the top result was this Jstor page for the academic article Erwin R. Steinberg, "James Joyce and the Critics Notwithstanding, Leopold Bloom Is Not Jewish", Journal of Modern Literature 9(1) (1981), pp. 27-49. This article says: At birth, Bloom was not circumcised, for, in the Nausicaa episode, ...


2

The clue to this question is in the text itself. By using the word "respectively", Joyce is telling the reader to take the marks in the order he has listed them. For example the Collins Dictionary definition: Respectively means in the same order as the items that you have just mentioned. Since each description of the mark extends in length and ...


1

“The last end” or the final end, the end of everything, is a poetic way of referring to death, which gives the story closure, as it is what the title and key topic of the story are. One of Joyce’s trademarks in his writing is his association and fusion of disparate things in the form of multi-meaning symbols or in this case a metaphor. The snow falls on the ...


1

Tindall is not to be recommended. Too little detail and much of it "without any further justification". You are much better with an up to date (4th) edition of McHugh's Annotations, and the Skeleton Key, or with Rose & O'Hanlons Understanding FW (harder to get). As you have gathered, the passage you refer to is one of many accounts of the marriage of ...


1

According to my professor, lists are common in epic poetry, and in that form they are not truly meant to be comprehended. They are meant to impress, to fill one with the sense that even if they read the entire work, there is still something they haven't quite gotten. The epic remains unconquered, even to its readers, because who has the capacity to keep 70 ...


1

The questioner loves James Joyce's writing but wonders why his work is considered "revolutionary". This question is not so easy to answer in a short Stack Exchange post, and many books have been written about James Joyce. James Joyce advances avant-garde literary techniques that began with Laurence Sterne's The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, ...


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