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A caudle (or caudel) was a hot drink that recurred in various guises throughout British cuisine from the Middle Ages into Victorian times. It was thick and sweet, and seen as particularly suitable and sustaining for invalids and new mothers. At some periods of history, caudle recipes were based on milk and eggs, like eggnog. Later variants were more similar ...


4

gather, n.2   Obsolete. The pluck (heart, liver and lights) of an animal, esp. of a sheep or calf. Also plural. a1600   T. Deloney Pleasant Hist. Iohn Winchcomb (1619) viii. sig. Kij   The sheepes heads, and the gathers, which you giue away at your gate, might serue them well enough. Oxford English Dictionary (‘Lights’ are lungs, so called because ...


4

The reference is to Pliny’s Natural History, where the Choromandae seem to be a species of monkey or ape found in the forests of India. sunt et satyri subsolanis indorum montibus (catarcludorum dicitur regio), pernicissimum animal, iam quadripedes, iam recte currentes humana effigie; propter velocitatem nisi senes aut aegri non capiuntur. choromandarum ...


4

Ancient and almost forgotten (wedding) custom is to not deny a traveler from your doorstep. In the times before hotels and such, a traveler would depend on the kindness of strangers who would let them sleep in their home, share meager food in exchange for tales of their travels or small gifts. One of the most ancient rights are so called guest rights, ...


3

I think this is one of those punning comparisons, that still exist in English today, but were more common in earlier centuries. For example, He lies like a rug. Here, the man is lying (telling untruths) in a different way than the rug is lying (being in a horizontal position on the floor). Looking in the OED for two possible definitions that would ...


2

This Broadview Press edition of Jack of Newbury gives the meaning as ‘neckerchief’. While this is all the information the glossary of that publication provides, the OED gives the following information under 'Neckinger': Origin: A variant or alteration of another lexical item. Etymon: neckercher n. Etymology: Variant of neckercher n. Perhaps ...


2

Because of the smell, he wonders if she has soiled the bed. Even today, "cack" is still used as a word for faeces. By searching the web for "cack a bed" (with the superfluous "e" removed), I found several results from 18th-century dictionaries between English and other languages such as French (1768), German (1788), and Dutch (1789). I didn't find any ...


2

George a Green is also known as the "Pindar of Wakefield" (pindar could also be spelled pinder or pinner). The book The History of George a Green; Pindar of the Town of Wakefield, published in 1827 (and available on Archive.org) reprinted a ballad that contains a precursor of "None shall pass" from Monty Python and the Holy Grail: In Wakefield there lives ...


1

Pippin here refers to a several varieties of eating apples. Wikipedia lists several varieties of pippin apples, but all of them date from the late seventeenth to the mid-eighteenth century. The variety in Thomas Deloney's novel must be older. Michaelmas is celebrated on 29 September. The ideal harvest time for apples varies a lot and depends both on the ...


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