49

It, and other London works, promoted individualism and attacked totalitarianism. Let's go back to the plot of The Call of the Wild. Rereading it, there are a few main incidents that jump out at me as part of a larger trend: Buck's attack in Seattle on the "stout man, with a red sweater"[1] who threatens him with a hatchet and club. His rivalry ...


37

Because of the author's socialist views. From Banned Books Week: Generally hailed as Jack London’s best work, The Call of the Wild is commonly challenged for its dark tone and bloody violence. Because it is seen as a man-and-his-dog story, it is sometimes read by adolescents and subsequently challenged for age-inappropriateness. Not only have objections ...


15

I think you're parsing the sentence a little bit wrong. It's not "leaped across time into the raw", it's "leaped across time into the raw, red drama and tragedy of ...". "Raw" is applied to the "red drama and tragedy", and I think the specific imagery here is of an untreated open wound: the drama and tragedy are ...


13

The meaning is a little clearer if we parse and excerpt the phrase a little differently. across time into the raw, red drama The adjective raw modifies drama, it's not a noun in this case. London, narrating, draws a connection between primitive vs civilized societies and raw vs cooked meat. And of course there are all kinds of colonialist implications to ...


7

Just to add a little more context to that quote: When Buck earned sixteen hundred dollars in five minutes for John Thornton, he made it possible for his master to pay off certain debts and to journey with his partners into the East after a fabled lost mine, the history of which was as old as the history of the country. Many men had sought it; few had ...


5

In your question, you left out a previous sentence that is important for figuring out what this means: This man was called "Beauty" by the other men of the fort. What your sentence means is that it's an "ironic nickname", like when a two meter tall man is called "Shorty"; see TVtropes. From Merriam-Webster: Antithesis: a ...


4

It's an interesting read. I agree with the other answers about the parsing. The consonance of "red" with "raw" enforce the relationship. Even so, Jack London has likely evoked the response he wanted from you, the reader. The "leap into the abyss", "leap into the great unknown", "leap of faith", all share a ...


3

As the other answers have suggested, you are parsing the sentence wrongly, although I disagree with them on how to group it. Suffice it to say, this is a tricky sentence! It is heavily recursive: multiple concepts are grouped together, then those wrapped-up groupings are themselves grouped together, etc. To undo the recursion, it's easiest to work from the ...


2

The protagonist is so cold that he can't strike a match using his frozen hands, so he's managing it with his teeth. He needs to separate one match from the bunch of matches, again using his teeth. In order to do this, he's baring his upper teeth by moving his lower jaw and upper lip out of the way: he "drew the lower jaw in" (meaning "in" ...


2

Martin has just read Herbert Spencer’s First Principles of a New System of Philosophy (1862), which describes a universal and teleological process of evolution spanning every scale from microscopic to galactic. Thus from the persistence of force follow, not only the various direct and indirect equilibrations going on around, together with that cosmical ...


1

As far back as the tradition goes, it still doesn't go back far enough to know who the first man was. It's adding to the first sentence that you quoted - about how it's shrouded in mystery. The passage is giving this as sort of an example. The "oldest tradition" means the farthest back that anyone knows. It stops, which means it reaches up to a certain ...


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