42

It's subtle and perhaps a bit of a stretch, but I think we can infer that Snape likes Draco for a similar reason to why he dislikes Harry. He dislikes Harry because Harry's father treated him badly at school. And he likes Draco because Draco's father treated him well at school. I'm mostly getting this from the following passage in the chapter "The Prince's ...


39

We don't know, but there's a lot of evidence supporting it. The Language of flowers, or floriography, goes back much further than Victorian times. It was used or alluded to in Shakespeare's plays (see also this question) and even the Hebrew Bible. It's unknown whether J.K. Rowling knew about it - she's never commented publicly on the wormwood/asphodel ...


31

In terms of explicit confirmation, the answer is a very solid no. At no point did any character, nor the omniscient narrator, identify Dumbledore's sexuality in simple terms. Signs and portents. Various writers have identified incidents and passages that might act as subtle indicators toward his sexuality. Note that all of these were spotted post-facto ...


22

WARNING: Spoilers ahead. (Emphasis mine on all quotes below) Why was Hedwig killed anyway? Other than the twitter link provided in the question, Rowling gave a fuller explanation in an interview (full transcript of the interview can be found here): Twinkletoes*: "Why did you feel that Hedwig's death was necessary?" J.K. Rowling: "The loss of Hedwig ...


21

Time Turners can't go back that far. J.K. Rowling has said that it's impossible for those 1-hour Time-Turners to go back farther than 5 hours. (See quote below.) So: She can't. If you're asking about making sure he doesn't come back, how would she do that? She can't do anything that would prevent him from coming back, as she doesn't have the power to be ...


20

If she did, she hasn't admitted it. In her writing on Pottermore she states: King's Cross, which is one of London's main railway stations, has a very personal significance for me, because my parents met on a train to Scotland which departed from King’s Cross station. For this reason, and because it has such an evocative and symbolic name, and because it ...


17

As stated in this same question on Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange, J. K. Rowling has never said anything stating whether or not this was intentional. We only have speculation to go on, so I will speculate :) My guess is yes. Why? Too much of a coincidence How likely is it that this was by accident? You've got him saying something that, when ...


16

On a Pottermore article ("Lily, Petunia, and the Language of Flowers") this is written: If his first words to Harry are anything to go by, the language of flowers suggests that Snape deeply regrets Lily Potter’s death. Also on monkshood and wolfsbane, the next tings he asks about: Snape also asks Harry what the difference is between monkshood and ...


16

Since this is basically the same question as the one on Sci-Fi I will summarize the answer from @Valorum. Basically, some wear underwear, some don't even go that far. Valorum gives more quotes (I encourage you to take a look at his answer), but I feel that these are the best examples. From The Order of the Phoenix, here's an example with underwear: ...


16

It is there... In the Amazon preview of the book, on page 122 there is a chapter on The Obscurus. If you're asking why it's not included in the' beasts' section, probably because: It's not strictly a beast. It's the magic of a wizard that was suppressed and is sort of a beast. It's a larger topic. These things are completely new. We know nothing about ...


15

Albus As you state, Albus translates to "white", which was a nod to alchemy: Colours also played their part in the naming of Hagrid and Dumbledore, whose first names are Rubeus (red) and Albus (white) respectively. The choice was a nod to alchemy, which is so important in the first Harry Potter book, where 'the red' and 'the white' are essential mystical ...


14

Oddly enough, Rowling has cited The Chronicles of Narnia as an inspiration for her King's Cross entryway to the world of magic, but not the part you're thinking of! I found myself thinking about the wardrobe route to Narnia when Harry is told he has to hurl himself at a barrier in Kings Cross Station - it dissolves and he's on platform Nine and Three-...


13

I believe all the Weasleys except Ron were named after either characters from Arthurian legend or historical royalty of England/Albion/Britain: Arthur (duh) Molly (sometimes a nickname for Margaret or Mary) William Charles Percival Frederick George Ginevra (a form of Guinevere)


11

JKR has stated this: Sybill's first name is a homonym of 'Sibyl', which was a female clairvoyant in ancient times. My American editor wanted me to use 'Sibyl', but I preferred my version, because while it keeps the reference to the august clairvoyants of old, it is really no more than a variant the [sic] unfashionable female name 'Sybil'. Professor ...


10

The last name is actually not that fancy. As this old interview with Rowling states: How did you decide what to name your characters and places? I collect unusual names. I have notebooks full of them. Some of the names I made up, like Quidditch, Malfoy. Other names mean something -- Dumbledore, which means "bumblebee" in Old English...seemed to suit ...


10

If we're interpreting the scene that Hamlet wrote about in his answer (I haven't read the books recently enough to recall whether Regulus' Quidditch position is mentioned elsewhere), I have another, perhaps simpler explanation. I think that Regulus' position is mentioned, specifically noticed by Harry, to create some form of kinship or connection between ...


10

"Scotland" is only mentioned once in the series, and that is as a Quidditch team in Chapter Five of Goblet of Fire: And Wales lost to Uganda, and Scotland was slaughtered by Luxembourg." In Chapter Sixteen of Deathly Hallows there is a mention of Harry and Hermione camping in a Scottish loch, but not in any relation to Hogwarts's location: They did ...


8

Whitewashing is distinct but related things. Changing an existing non-white character to be a white one. Using white characters in a setting that would typically have non-whites. White actors, directors, writers, singers (i.e. content creators) receiving the majority of awards and accolades. The fact that it is white people being accused off this action ...


6

There are a couple of possible reasons why the spacing was chosen in a different way from that of the original unreversed words (which is, by the way, a very minor stylistic choice) ... To make the 'words' in the reversed inscription sound more like real words. Compare "Erised stra ehru oyt ube cafru oyt on wohsi" with "Erised straeh ruoy tub ecaf ruoy ton ...


6

The strongest evidence (in my opinion) is Dumbledore's unwavering trust. When other characters doubted him, Dumbledore always affirmed his confidence, but never gave others a reason to share it. This clearly suggests that he possesses some secret knowledge. For example, when Harry and Lupin discuss Snape (Half Blood Prince) we have the following exchange ...


5

As previously answered on another Stack Exchange site; some things were certainly pre-planned (h/t yannis in the comments). According to an archived version of Potter FAQ on Rowling's website: 'The Half-Blood Prince' might be described as a strand of the overall plot. That strand could be used in a whole variety of ways and back in 1997 I considered ...


5

In Chamber of Secrets (p. 106) we read as follows: Harry looked bemusedly at the photograph Colin was brandishing under his nose. A moving, black-and-white Lockhart was tugging on an arm Harry recognized as his own. He was pleased to see that his photographic self was putting up a good fight and refusing to be dragged into view. As Harry ...


5

Spoilers involved! TL;DR at the bottom. In an interview (1,2,3), the author says the following about the name Narcissa (emphasis mine): queenmarion: I noticed in the Black Family tree that everyone is named after a constellation. Is this intentional? Does this have any bearing on the plot? JK Rowling: It's just one of those family traditions, ...


3

One piece of evidence (I'm sure that there's more): In an early Quidditch match, Harry's broom starts trying to buck him off. Hermione sees that Snape is mouthing an incantation so sneaks over to try and put him off by setting fire to his robe. It transpires that Quirrell is performing the incantation and Snape is muttering a counter-curse to keep Harry ...


3

Pottermore says: All attempts to travel back further than a few hours have resulted in catastrophic harm to the witch or wizard involved. There was longer-range time-turner but it was not available to the characters during the events of Harry Potter books 1-7.


3

In this case, whitewashing is basically exactly what it sounds like. It's taking a canonically PoC (Person of Colour) character and portraying them as white instead, either through art or film or fanfic or what have you. Basically, taking away any reference to their race and making them look/act like a white person, even though the canonical media states/...


3

Based on the textual evidence, I disagree with JKR. In HP4, when Hermione first appears in her ball gown, Harry merely says that "she didn't look like Hermione at all." It's merely implied and not stated that she looks better than usual. Also starting in HP4, Ron gets jealous of Krum and Hermione is annoyed at Ron for not understanding her feelings, which is ...


3

It depends on what you mean by "all along." Snape was actually working for Voldemort, and then after he realized that Voldemort intended to kill the Potters he became loyal to Dumbledore and (apparently) remained so for the rest of his life. (His actions in the sixth book were entirely taken in an effort to re-establish his cover with the Death Eaters, not ...


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