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9 votes
Accepted

Meaning of "My owners'll have to rank with the rest on their charter-party"?

Here's the situation with commercial shipping. You are a Norwegian timber merchant, with many planks of finest spruce to sell. You believe that you can make lots of money, if only you could deliver ...
alexg's user avatar
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4 votes

Meaning of "My owners'll have to rank with the rest on their charter-party"?

The sentence you quote needs a bit of prefatory explanation to make its meaning clear. But in the process, I shall probably let drop major spoilers. Sadly ’Can’t make an omelette without breaking eggs’...
schweppz's user avatar
  • 1,209
3 votes

What does "The Shampoo" written by Elizabeth Bishop tell?

This is a love poem, written to Elizabeth Bishop's lover Lota de Macedo Soares. I am going to give a very impressionistic interpretation of it. A more literal close reading may not yield the same ...
Peter Shor's user avatar
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3 votes

What does "The Shampoo" written by Elizabeth Bishop tell?

This is a poem about people's perception of, and response to, love and ageing and the passing of time. But it doesn't start that way. Rather, the first verse appears to be a poetic meditation on ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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2 votes

Who is the "lady weeping at the crossroads" in W. H. Auden's poem?

I have an answer to this question that I suspect will be controversial, but it addresses more aspects of the poem than any I've seen on the web: My answer: the lady weeping at the crossroads is Lord ...
Peter Shor's user avatar
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2 votes

Emily Jane Pfeiffer’s “To the Blind Architect of the City of Life”

Emily Pfeiffer was an educated Victorian lady, and as Eric Robertson noted in his introduction to English Poetesses: A Series of Critical Biographies, her sonnets ”deal with the two great questions of ...
Clara Díaz Sanchez's user avatar
1 vote

Who is the "creature" in the final verses of this poem?

Thinking about this poem some more, I have come to the conclusion that the creature is indeed the Devil, and Elinor Wylie is either unaware of or is disregarding the folklore about the Devil and ...
Peter Shor's user avatar
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1 vote

Marianne Moore’s ‘Four Quartz Crystal Clocks’

(Revised in the light of comments from OP and @ClaraDiazSanchez) The poem contrasts the precision of scientific timekeeping with the disorder of lived experience, and examines the yin-yang ...
verbose's user avatar
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1 vote

Meaning behind “Where Once The Waters Of Your Face“

It's about miscarriage My interpretation: the poet is trying to comfort a woman, probably his lover, who has suffered a miscarriage. The meaning of this poem is not stated explicitly, but is heavily ...
Peter Shor's user avatar
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